The Book Thread #2

PathMaster

My life for Aiur!
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
0
Location
Adirondacks
Good way to put it. If anyone finds a e-book bundle of the dresden files let me know.
Yea, and ebook bundle would be great.

I started to get bored of them around book 9. And I basically stopped after 13. I know there are only 2 more, plus I think he's working on a new one, but I just can't find the interest to continue. I'd probably enjoy just going back and listening to the first 5 again more than continuing.
Really? I loved them all. Most were fast reads and if anything I really loved the last few.
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
12
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Yea, and ebook bundle would be great.

Really? I loved them all. Most were fast reads and if anything I really loved the last few.
Amazon has a bundle of sorts. You can buy all 15 of them with one click, but it's $140.

And yeah, once he started getting away from local detective work and began saving the world, I got bored. I liked the local stories of him being a detective far more than the huge battles between good and evil. They all started to feel the same and we know how virtually every one of the books will end. Sure there was that twist at the end of book 12, but it's not like Harry is ever in any real danger. He has to keep upping the stakes, and I get that, it just bores me. It's also possible that I got burnt out on them, and I'll probably finish the series eventually, but I need to take at least a year off before moving to book 14 and 15, and eventually 16 when that comes out.
 

PathMaster

My life for Aiur!
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
0
Location
Adirondacks
Amazon has a bundle of sorts. You can buy all 15 of them with one click, but it's $140.

And yeah, once he started getting away from local detective work and began saving the world, I got bored. I liked the local stories of him being a detective far more than the huge battles between good and evil. They all started to feel the same and we know how virtually every one of the books will end. Sure there was that twist at the end of book 12, but it's not like Harry is ever in any real danger. He has to keep upping the stakes, and I get that, it just bores me. It's also possible that I got burnt out on them, and I'll probably finish the series eventually, but I need to take at least a year off before moving to book 14 and 15, and eventually 16 when that comes out.
$10 a book is steep for a bundle I think. ;)

I can understand being burnt out. The stories did escalate quickly and crazily. I liked the story line that is currently going on so I am enjoying it a lot. But I do agree that his local detective work was excellent and it would be great if it went back to that.
 

Exodus

Vampire Robot Dragon
Joined
Apr 9, 2009
Likes
1
Location
Toronto, ON
$10 a book is steep for a bundle I think. ;)

I can understand being burnt out. The stories did escalate quickly and crazily. I liked the story line that is currently going on so I am enjoying it a lot. But I do agree that his local detective work was excellent and it would be great if it went back to that.
I think what hurts the series overall is that the books aren't very long. It's popcorn literature where each book can be knocked out in a few hours each so the arc is never very long it's almost like each is meant to be a tv episode. Guy needs to write a bigger story if that makes sense I know he's got so many books out but not one that is very long.

I just feel like I'm reading a buffy the vampire slayer book series.
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
12
Location
Phoenix, AZ
I think what hurts the series overall is that the books aren't very long. It's popcorn literature where each book can be knocked out in a few hours each so the arc is never very long it's almost like each is meant to be a tv episode. Guy needs to write a bigger story if that makes sense I know he's got so many books out but not one that is very long.

I just feel like I'm reading a buffy the vampire slayer book series.
I kind of like that they're short, I just wish they weren't so apocalyptic. Although it's also the longest series I've ever gotten into (outside of the Hardy Boys as a kid). I think keeping anything going that long is difficult. We all love Firefly, but would we have the same affection for it had it gone on for 10 seasons? I doubt it. It has to get harder and harder with each book to tell a compelling story with characters that we know are immortal and are guaranteed to win that still feels fresh and interesting. I don't envy his position, but I think I would have more affection for the series had he basically written a finale in book 8 or something, leaving me wanting more but never getting it.
 

Vandabo

Guise srsly
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
1
Location
Corvallis, OR
Just finished the last of the Altered Carbon books (for my third rereading). Goddamn they are really good. Each book has such a different feel but they all build on each other in a really satisfying way. They bring up a lot of great moral conundrums stemming from the technology to record and transplant human consciousness. If anybody wants a trilogy of gritty but thoughtful cyberpunkish novels, I'd heartily recommend this series.
 
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
12
Location
Phoenix, AZ
Just finished the last of the Altered Carbon books (for my third rereading). Goddamn they are really good. Each book has such a different feel but they all build on each other in a really satisfying way. They bring up a lot of great moral conundrums stemming from the technology to record and transplant human consciousness. If anybody wants a trilogy of gritty but thoughtful cyberpunkish novels, I'd heartily recommend this series.
I really liked the first book, but hated the second so much that I didn't even try the third.

I'm currently listening to and almost finished with "Second Hand Curses". Drew Hayes is definitely my favorite author right now. All of his series are great fun, and I haven't read/listened to a book of his I didn't thoroughly enjoy.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Likes
4
Location
Akron, Ohio
I've been reading a lot more the last couple years(I'm on the colony of readers group under goodreads) and put altered carbon on my queue for Overdrive (amazing app for those like me who are doing mass reading on a budget) I started watching the show and I'm liking it a lot, which is surprising because I absolutely hated the main character's actor in suicide squad.
I've been switching between fantasy and sci fi for reading, with a bit of Stephen king because he's awesome.
Right now I'm reading Calibans war (expanse book 2) and I'm enjoying the main character carried over from the first book. Just trying to find my groove on it.
Looking forward to Head On by John Scalzi (Lock in sequel). Got to meet him a few years back and he's a great event to go to.
Also working on Godsgrave (Nevernight #2)
While it's better than the first, mainly due to lack of the Harry potter like high school bs, I find getting uncomfortable with the sex parts. They get really graphic. I guess I'm not much for romance novels.
But otherwise I'm enjoying it.
 

Vandabo

Guise srsly
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
1
Location
Corvallis, OR
Right now I'm reading Calibans war (expanse book 2) and I'm enjoying the main character carried over from the first book. Just trying to find my groove on it.
Aww yeah, I love the Expanse series. I just recently finished rereading that series before reading the one that was just released. It's some of my favorite harder sci-fi. I love sci-fi action that actually sticks to somewhat realistic physics, especially for weaponry and spaceflight. The Expanse seems to strike an almost perfect balance between real physics and science fantasy, which is very special.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Likes
4
Location
Akron, Ohio
Aww yeah, I love the Expanse series. I just recently finished rereading that series before reading the one that was just released. It's some of my favorite harder sci-fi. I love sci-fi action that actually sticks to somewhat realistic physics, especially for weaponry and spaceflight. The Expanse seems to strike an almost perfect balance between real physics and science fantasy, which is very special.
Yeah, that has definitely got me hooked, just trying to push through Godsgrave to give it the attention it deserves.
I do really like the realism that it offers, no hyper light speed travel here.
 

PathMaster

My life for Aiur!
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
0
Location
Adirondacks
I have really started to read book one of the Malazan series. It is a hard read for sure as the story is all over the place, but some things are starting to come together after about a third of the way through.
 

PathMaster

My life for Aiur!
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
0
Location
Adirondacks
I am now about 70% through Gardens of the Moon, Book 1 of the Malazan Book of the Fallen. It makes far more sense now. The story is coming together far more than it was previously. I am still a little in the weeds, but I am thoroughly enjoying this book.
 

Exodus

Vampire Robot Dragon
Joined
Apr 9, 2009
Likes
1
Location
Toronto, ON
I am now about 70% through Gardens of the Moon, Book 1 of the Malazan Book of the Fallen. It makes far more sense now. The story is coming together far more than it was previously. I am still a little in the weeds, but I am thoroughly enjoying this book.
Yeah, malazan is tough read if you want immediate pay out. Honestly you won't really get it fully even 2 books in and the 3rd starts off with a brand new character to the cast. Yeesh was that driving me nuts 7yrs back.
 

evilgoodwin

Abomination Unto Nuggan
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Likes
3
Location
Austin, Texas
Just wait until book 5 when it's a prequel that's on another continent with a completely new cast. That threw me for a loop. Love the series, though. Even read all of the side books written by Esselmont.
 

Exodus

Vampire Robot Dragon
Joined
Apr 9, 2009
Likes
1
Location
Toronto, ON
Just wait until book 5 when it's a prequel that's on another continent with a completely new cast. That threw me for a loop. Love the series, though. Even read all of the side books written by Esselmont.
But when it finally all comes together it's like oh yah and you have a totally different perspective on the character than when you initially are introduced to him. Was pretty cool. The series makes game of thrones seem like childs play when it comes to elaboration and the author keeps it all together and it makes sense.
 

evilgoodwin

Abomination Unto Nuggan
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Likes
3
Location
Austin, Texas
But when it finally all comes together it's like oh yah and you have a totally different perspective on the character than when you initially are introduced to him. Was pretty cool. The series makes game of thrones seem like childs play when it comes to elaboration and the author keeps it all together and it makes sense.
Seriously. I had a few complete reversals on characters that I thought I hated. And the death count! People give GRRM shit about killing their favorite characters? Erickson will kill that character, their whole bloodline, and then burn down the country they're from.
 
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Likes
4
Location
Akron, Ohio
Had to take a break from the stone sky, since the 3 branching storylines are starting to drive me nuts. Also about halfway through Calibans war, a lot more politically involved than the first expanse book, but it's starting to pick up more. Also started Odd Thomas and it's interesting, at least, for me first Koontz book.
 

VerseD

Wyrd bið ful aræd
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Likes
7
Location
Krung Thep
I like to read books from places I travel to, so recently that's meant a lot of Japanese realist authors, like Dazai Osamu and Yasunari Kawabata (though Mishima Yukio still takes the cake as far as I'm concerned), and now a few books by the surrealist Falknerian Czech writer Bohumil Hrabal, which I really recommend. He's the sort of author to write one whole book, "Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age," as one whole sentence. I'm in Ukraine now, so I rather unfairly started to read Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky's book on film and art "Sculpting in Time."

Soon it will be time to pick up "A Memoir of the Warsaw Uprising" by Miron Białoszewski and "The Doll" by Bolesław Prus, a product of the nineteenth century often described as the greatest Polish novel. So no happy endings here.

I also read a few "Star Wars" books. Great to see Timothy Zahn back in the saddle.

I am now about 70% through Gardens of the Moon, Book 1 of the Malazan Book of the Fallen. It makes far more sense now. The story is coming together far more than it was previously. I am still a little in the weeds, but I am thoroughly enjoying this book.
I was planning on starting this soon. I loved Glen Cook's Black Company books, so I feel like Erikson's are an almost necessary counterbalance in the history of fantasy fiction. But with 10 volumes and 11,216 total pages (16 days by audiobook), it's a commitment. Maybe next month!
 
Joined
Nov 6, 2011
Likes
16
Location
NYC
I like to read books from places I travel to, so recently that's meant a lot of Japanese realist authors, like Dazai Osamu and Yasunari Kawabata (though Mishima Yukio still takes the cake as far as I'm concerned), and now a few books by the surrealist Falknerian Czech writer Bohumil Hrabal, which I really recommend. He's the sort of author to write one whole book, "Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age," as one whole sentence. I'm in Ukraine now, so I rather unfairly started to read Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky's book on film and art "Sculpting in Time."
Love Hrabal. Have you read Klima? Different, but there is something at the heart of them both that's similar. Oh! Also Škvorecký.

Have you read Akutagawa? I'm in the beginning stages of a love affair (though Murakami is my true love). Also: read Pale Fire. Twice.
 

VerseD

Wyrd bið ful aræd
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Likes
7
Location
Krung Thep
No Klima or Škvorecký, but I do love Nabokov.

Akutagawa is one Japanese author I never read but mean to, along with Murakami Ryū and the burakumin/outcaste author Nakagami Kenji. Both of those wrote in the 1970s and 80s very dark novels about the hopelessness and deracination of modern Japan. Murakami Haruki's escapism is a product of that same era, as is the preference of most Japanese people today for lighter fare.
 
Joined
Nov 6, 2011
Likes
16
Location
NYC
Kenji has no been added to my reading list!

Klimas's The Ultimate Intimacy gutted me.

Figured since you were in Russian proximity reading the most non-Russian (setting) Russian novel of the last century was appropriate.

My Polish friends do mention Prus but I admit I haven't read it. You're going to Poland? If you pass by/through Krakow, Auschwitz (and Birkenau) is a must. I have never felt the weight of history as much as I have there.
 

VerseD

Wyrd bið ful aræd
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Likes
7
Location
Krung Thep
I went to Russia two years ago and spent every hour that my girlfriend wasn't nearby running after the houses of Russian authors -- Pushkin, Gogol, Tolstoy, and Dostoevsky. It was well worth it. I also spent a year living in Bangkok, where despite all my efforts I found it impossible to read a novel about Thailand by a Thai author written or translated into English. There were plenty of books written by Americans and Brits and Australians about their own life in Thailand or their perception of how Thai people live, but that's not worth considering.
 

VerseD

Wyrd bið ful aræd
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Likes
7
Location
Krung Thep
Maybe I'm reading you wrong, but to visit a country is not an endorsement of its government. At least, I hope it's not, since I have probably never visited a country with a government I would choose to endorse (maybe Spain, which had no formal government when I went there), and I have visited several and have lived and paid taxes in two (Japan and Thailand) where I can point to serious political problems. Tourism is a profitable industry that is often dominated by the local elite, but it's also possible to travel in a way that most of your impact is at a grassroots level. Just do some research, get off the beaten path, talk to local people, ask questions, be ready to listen and learn, assert your principles when necessary. Hey, that's starting to sound like a mechanism for change.

It's not always so simple, of course. Last year I made the mistake of going to Angkor Wat in Cambodia and paying a $62 ticket price into the pocket of an unaccountable politician in Phnom Penh, while the people Wat suffer under desperate and avoidable poverty. Some travelers would like to visit North Korea, where it's not really possible to engage with local people without endangering them. I would love to visit Iran, a country whose literature I would wholeheartedly endorse, but for Americans the visa is notoriously difficult.
 
Joined
Nov 6, 2011
Likes
16
Location
NYC
I believe he was referring to the way LGBQT people are treated there. Very hostile.

I knew someone who lived in Moscow (who was a native Russian) and was beaten severely. We've lost touch, but as of four years ago he had left Russia (possibly for good) and was traveling around Europe/Asia for a while before deciding what to do. I remember him mentioning that it was getting worse in recent times (though he didn't come out until he was in his early 20s).
 

maharahaj

Humanity is the Devil
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
0
Location
Valley Forge, PA
I'm going to St. Petersburg in 2 months and 1 week with 2 of my buddies for the World Cup. We're all looking forward to it, but I don't think any of us with venture out on our own during the evening like we did in Germany 1.5 years ago.
 

VerseD

Wyrd bið ful aræd
Joined
Oct 2, 2008
Likes
7
Location
Krung Thep
I believe he was referring to the way LGBQT people are treated there. Very hostile.
That's true, and a lot of those attitudes are spreading into the city and growing more brazen as homophobia has become a lever in politics.

I'm going to St. Petersburg in 2 months and 1 week with 2 of my buddies for the World Cup. We're all looking forward to it, but I don't think any of us with venture out on our own during the evening like we did in Germany 1.5 years ago.
That's too bad. There is a somewhat new but rapidly growing craft beer scene in St. Petersburg and, while nowhere is perfectly safe, I was happy to wander around drunk and alone a few nights.
 

MagGnome

Le nain de jardin
Joined
Jan 8, 2016
Likes
27
Location
Minneapolis, MN
Yes, I was referring to the treatment of LGBTQ folks. There are some countries, like Russia, where it's just not safe for me to visit. Heck there are parts of the United States where I would not feel comfortable. I'm lucky (I guess?) in that it is rather easy for me to pass as straight, but some places just aren't worth the risk, unfortunately.

VerseD, I like what you said about being an agent of change when travelling. Meeting locals and forming connections across cultures and languages is such a rewarding experience. I have many fond memories of the people I've met while traveling.
 

maharahaj

Humanity is the Devil
Joined
Oct 1, 2008
Likes
0
Location
Valley Forge, PA
Thanks for the link VerseD. The 3 of us going are all craft beer enthusiasts, so I'll give that list a good checking out.

On topic, I finished Stephen King's Lisey's Story. It supposedly is his favorite work. It was weird though and not what I was expecting; kind of a hodgepodge of ideas. I think it might be one of those books that I would enjoy more so when reading it a second time with an understanding of what he is trying to do.

On to The Dead Zone!