Gaming YouTube Channels

TheKeck

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#1
So, I've found myself finding and consuming various game related YouTube channels which I've found very interesting. I thought it would be fun to share what we watch and possibly learn about new videos that might interest us.

Extra Credits - Been following this one the longest. Good in depth analysis of myriad aspects of game design.

Summoning Salt - Speed running content. In particular, breakdowns of the world record progression of many popular games. I love learning about all the intricacies that go into honing and improving these speed runs.

videogamedunkey - Picked this one up from Young Al Capone. Much more profane than I would care for, but usually hilarious and insightful.

Gamechamp3000 - VG Myths - This is a playlist that I just discovered today! This guy gives himself crazy tasks, and then pulls them off. Two examples are Zelda BotW without ever using the climb mechanic, and Mario Odyssey without ever increasing the in game jump counter. It's been fascinating!


So, what about you guys? Anything I should be checking out?
 

Dav Slinker

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#2
Did You Know gaming is a series that has bunches of background information with years of content at this point.

JonTron is hilarious, and usually insightful, while not being nearly as foul-mouthed as Dunkey. Highly recommend.

Apollo legend is a channel revolving around speedrunning chock full of interesting info, definitely look it up if the subject interests you.

Angry Video Game Nerd is like the godfather of YouTube video game channels, though I've found his content to be lacking in the last couple years. He has quite a backlog of videos, however, that are great. He is extraordinarily foul-mouthed, though, it's part of his character, so tread lightly if that's a no-go for you.

Egoraptor (Arin Hanson of Game Grumps) has a number of videos under a series named sequelitis that really digs into video game design in an insightful and informative manner. He doesn't still make them as game grumps is by FAR more profitable, but the few he has are worth checking out.

SunlightBlade makes videos relating to the Dark Souls and Bloodborne series, with a focus on top ten lists centred around various gameplay and aesthetic themes. Worth looking at if you like those games.

A_seagull is a professional Overwatch player who showcases stellar play but also does a good job explaining the hows and whys of professional level pay for the game.

There are a number of let's players I could recommend if that's what you're into as well.
 

Stoke

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#4
noclip - Incredibly in-depth and well produced video game documentaries by former Gamespot employee Danny O'Dwyer. Some trailers for a couple of his docs: The rebuilding of FFXIV and the making of Warframe.

Easy Allies - Reviews and other stuff from some of the people that used to work at GameTrailers.tv.

Giant Bomb - The Youtube channel of Giantbomb.com. Has most (all?) of their non-premium subscriber stuff and is by far my favorite video game site.

ACG / Angry Centaur Gaming - A channel by our very own Genius Wrangler.
 

Young Al Capone

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#5
Lazy Game Reviews. He mostly focuses on old dos games and tech, but features a little of everything.

Pushing Up Roses. No attention span coupled with impatience has made playing adventure games next to impossible for me. She loves them and does in-depth analysis, I get to finally see why people loved old adventure games so much.

Gaming Historian. Exactly what it says, good stuff.

noclip is really good. Gamespot has a ton of good making ofs and documentaries. Giantbomb has the quicklooks and bombcast.
 
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#6
Most of the ones that I watch have already been mentioned, but one that hasn't is The 8-Bit Guy. He's a turbo nerd who does really in depth videos talking about vintage computer and gaming systems. He explains how the systems work and how the software and games were programmed to work with the strengths and weaknesses of the various hardware. I've learned a lot about how old computers and consoles worked, and gained a lot of respect for the programmers that figured out how to milk every last drop of performance out of those old machines.
 
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#10
Genuinely curious, as I've not seen any of these. Is the idea that you watch someone review and/or play games, and also speak about them?

Interesting. I'm not judging*, as this to me falls in the same area as playing games. It's just that I find this particular subset of it fascinating.


*Also, I've legit played (listened, not watched) the ten hour version of this for 6.5 hours, with the goal being all ten:
 
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#11
I watch several channels that are comedic let's players, who just play the game and talk along with it, kind of like MST3k for games (although the games aren't necessarily bad). Most of the channels in this thread so far tend to be more analytical, either talking about the design of specific games or about game design in general. Also several of these channels go into detail about the hardware, like the history of the consoles and computers used to play the games.
 

Dav Slinker

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#29
A little research suggests to me that the snow thing is not a myth, though it was been derided as so by many.

Didn't know about problematic nature of the word eskimo. That's unfortunate.
Well, it's like this. We have the word "snow," yeah? What if we're trying to describe the snow further? Like light, powdery snow? Or those big clusters of flakes that fall but are very light? Or small, heavy flakes of snow? In circumpolar linguistic traditions, each of these types of snow has a specific word, yeah? Whereas we use a specific phrase by way of description. So we have just as many expressions for types of snow as they do, just we express it in a different way, by using multiple words or compound words versus their specific words. So while largely they DO have a lot of names for snow, the varying words come from a more common necessity of specific description.

For example. It's winter. Your pal has just come from a known hunting ground. You wanna know how the weather is. If he tells you "it's snowy" it's like... No duh. We're in the Yukon and it's January. What KIND of snow? Little light flakes? That's fine, I can deal with that and go hunting tomorrow. Big wet flakes that fall fast and freeze hard due to wind? Huge downpour with bad visibility? Maybe I try another hunting ground.

It's a very specific language in this regard because primary concerns are the weather and hunting, because up until the last hundred years or so, hunting as the only way to get food in MOST of these areas, whereas now there are a few settlements where you can buy food readily - though high freight prices often makes that option a luxury rather than common option and lots of people still practice subsistence hunting to this day. Their language didn't much change to accommodate the times, they just learned to speak English in addition. So at least their many versions of the same word are necessary at the very least in a historical sense whereas the myriad expressions for "what's up guys" all serve the same purpose - informal plural greeting.

It's totally reasonable to not know that the word can be offensive, the chances of meeting someone whom it offends are pretty low the further south you go. Among US territory, only those in Alaska will come across them with any frequency. We do hear a bit more about it in Canada due to proximity and comparatively strong aboriginal rights advocates (which is not to say they hold nearly enough sway, but I fancy we do alright compared to our southern neighbors). The word Eskimo wasn't always necessarily offensive, though! It was once just a label for specific people. Over time, though, white people ruined it, as we do most things, like The House of Blues, Curry, sushi, probably most Mexican food, et al. It was rumored to be "eater of raw meat" for a while, which helped the propaganda that they were "savages." Though raw meat was a staple food and genetic studies have shown members of the Inuit tribes have adapted particularly well to metabolising raw meat. But you use any word on a pejorative sense while rounding people up and it becomes a sensitive issue once you've finished claiming their land. There have been suggestions that the name "eskimo" was given by French explorers (Canada had a lot of those) from the word "esquimault," which I believe means "makers of stringed shoes," referring to snowshoes. This unfortunately was suggested too late to divert the narrative of the "savage northern tribes" for the most part, though some tribes, mostly in Alaska, still readily use and identify with the phrase.

I don't feel like we're fighting either! Just sharing facts I know aren't widely known in all circles. And you never know! Could save you from getting yelled at one day. Though having been to the far north myself my travel advisory is "don't."

Er... Video games. Right?
 

TheKeck

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#31
Well, it's like this. We have the word "snow," yeah? What if we're trying to describe the snow further? Like light, powdery snow? Or those big clusters of flakes that fall but are very light? Or small, heavy flakes of snow? In circumpolar linguistic traditions, each of these types of snow has a specific word, yeah? Whereas we use a specific phrase by way of description. So we have just as many expressions for types of snow as they do, just we express it in a different way, by using multiple words or compound words versus their specific words. So while largely they DO have a lot of names for snow, the varying words come from a more common necessity of specific description.

For example. It's winter. Your pal has just come from a known hunting ground. You wanna know how the weather is. If he tells you "it's snowy" it's like... No duh. We're in the Yukon and it's January. What KIND of snow? Little light flakes? That's fine, I can deal with that and go hunting tomorrow. Big wet flakes that fall fast and freeze hard due to wind? Huge downpour with bad visibility? Maybe I try another hunting ground.
Yes, exactly. That was my understanding. And it's cool! Because they have a very real need to talk about all these subtleties, they have naturally developed specific words than mean those different things. Where in other languages we would just need to use descriptive modifiers.

Part of the criticism is that the Inuit language apparently uses a lot of suffixes to add descriptions to words. So one big compound word can express something that would be a sentence in English. People thought the original guy who pointed out the snow thing was just referring to this phenomenon. However, the thing I read said there are legitimately around 50 base words that mean different varieties of snow.
 
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Dav Slinker

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#32
That was longer than one of my finals last semester.
That says far more about you than it does about me. ;)
Yes, exactly. That was my understanding. And it's cool! Because they have a very real need to talk about all these subtleties, they have naturally developed specific words than mean those different things. Where in other languages we would just need to use descriptive modifiers.

Part of the criticism is that the Inuit language apparently uses a lot of suffixes to add descriptions to words. So one big compound word can express something that would be a sentence in English. People thought the original guy who pointed out the snow thing was just referring to this phenomenon. However, the thing I read said there are legitimately around 50 base words that mean different varieties of snow.
True! But I'd argue that "kinds of snow" is an important distinction from "snow."
 

TheKeck

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#39
Have at you, blaggard!
I think words that describe different types of snow are "words for snow". I think the truth lies somewhere in the middle on this whole issue. K, I'm done arguing. :p

As it so happens, I read this article the other day. It doesn't talk about the words for snow, thing, but very related concepts and it was fascinating to me.

https://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/29/magazine/29language-t.html?nytmobile=0
(Will use up one of your New York Times articles for the month, or however that all works.)
 
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#40
Boy I don't know what kind of bullet trains are running in your colon, but if I time my trip to the bathroom against the time it takes me to read a piece of flash fiction, it ain't close.
1. You need to look into probiotics and fiber pills.
2. Flash Fiction encompasses anything from a sentence to generally 2000 words. Your shits should not take 2000 words.
3. You should read Lydia Davis.
4. See #1 above.
 
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