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Old 08-04-2010, 07:30 PM   #21
Whunpo
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Originally Posted by Chris_D View Post
I'm some way from being a parent but I'm not sure about how I'd feel paying 10-20k a year for my kid to fart around at university. Having said that, Japanese universities are basically 4 years of farting around, achieving very little.
That's how I feel. Why should I waste the money being spent on my education?
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10 characteeeeeeeeeeeeeeersssssssssssssssssssssssss
Now, that's a pretty ignorant statement, but I still think the test has some merit. Even if it won't tell you to skip college, rent a flat and start painting.
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Old 08-04-2010, 07:48 PM   #22
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Career tests are on approximately the the same level of usefulness as phrenology.

My condolences on your loss of $700.

The only test I can give you as far as what you may well be suited for, is imagine something you might like to do, then imagine all the worst and most difficult parts of that job, and then imagine doing those parts day in and day out for the rest of your life.

If you're still cool with it, then you might look into that.
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Old 08-04-2010, 08:23 PM   #23
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Not being able to enter as Undeclared is really weird in my opinion along with programs that require four years to complete. At my school, we are required to take many courses that specifically aren't a part of our major and if you go 2 semesters Undeclared, you can easily get a degree in the next 3 years. Even with the engineering degree that I plan to get taking the most credit hours of any program, I will still have time for plenty of other classes towards a minor or just for fun. I would definitely see how many credit hours the programs take and work with the academic advisors to see how they fit into a four year schedule.
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Old 08-04-2010, 08:37 PM   #24
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My advice would be to not worry about making a mistake with your major. I had to change majors my second semester when I figured out I wouldn't be able to stand computer science for the rest of my life. At that point I had a decision. I could work my ass of to still graduate in 4 years, or I could take it easy and do it in 5. I chose the latter. I realize there's a stigma in achieving a 4 year degree in 5 years but honestly anyone that thinks that can fuck right off. I used my extra time to take classes that had nothing to do with my major. If I saw something I thought would be cool I signed up, and most of the time it was an excellent decision. You will learn more about yourself and what makes you happy by taking chances than you could from a $700 test and 4 years of rigid curriculum.

Also, that degree? Chances are you won't even use it in whatever you end up doing.
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Old 08-13-2010, 03:48 AM   #25
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I'm home from the test and vacation, and I must say I think the whole thing was worth it. Thinking of it as a career placement test isn't right. Instead it was more like a test that analyzed my brain, and gave me ideas on how to live my life (from college to work to everyday things) maximizing my skills and abilities.
I have a huge packet of results to go through and I will post more about them if anyone is interested. But the test gave me a lot of direction and fresh ideas that I think will be very helpful in college.
They did nothing like "Oh you'd e a great engineer. Go do that."
They also didn't hate on art at all. They did a few tests about art and apparently I have an eye for art that is on par with someone with an art degree. And I've never even taken an art class.
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Old 08-13-2010, 07:01 AM   #26
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I'd be interested in whatever results you wished to share. But I'll also warn you that others may not be so...respectful...of what you post. I'm genuinely interested, not knowing anything about this test.
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Old 08-13-2010, 09:21 AM   #27
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I am quite interested, too. I've always liked reading analyses on a person's brain and personality, etc.

Gives me a better idea about the best way to kill them.
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Old 08-13-2010, 09:54 AM   #28
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I'd be very interested to see the results you'd be willing to post, as well. I've always found these sorts of tests fascinating, and I wish I knew more about how they're developed.

And hey, if it helps you figure out what you want to study, that's awesome. I wasted three semesters realizing that I hated my major until I finally switched to something that was a better fit.
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Old 08-13-2010, 10:22 AM   #29
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Man, I could of analyzed you for $700.
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Old 08-13-2010, 10:44 AM   #30
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I was told by an apptitude test in highschool that I was in the 98% percentile for math, and that I should pursue it as a career. I took a summer math class before college and havent seen a math test since. Just sayin'.

I really dislike the idea that one can "waste" any time at college, no matter what your doing. As far as I can tell after graduating, having a college degree is basically just a way of telling people that you're smart enough to finish college. You had the direction and determination to be given a degree at the end of your tenure. I've never once been asked how long it took, if I stuck to a single major or even what my degree was in. It's like a highschool diploma for the new millenium.

What I considered truely valuable about college is all the personal growth I went through in the 5 years I spent there. I never changed my major, but I loaded my schedule with classes I found interesting instead of easy classes to finish as quickly as possible. An ex-GF of mine finished in 3 years and she's far from what I'd call a well rounded human being. I even took summer school every year, which is even more money down the drain if you look at it that way. Its also probably why I graduated with about 30 more credits than I needed.

Anyways, I'm getting away from the point. At the risk of using a cliche, college is a journey, not a destination. It really isn't about chosing a direction and sticking to it. You'll find your direction as soon as your ready. Until then, I'd do what Ox suggested and go Liberal Arts at first. Take an engineering class, take an art class, take a historical philosophy class, whatever interests you. Then make your decisions on direction once you've been properly informed.
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Old 08-14-2010, 08:05 PM   #31
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It wasn't an aptitude like that, Scaryfaced. I was tested on math, but on different types of math. And though I did fairly well on them, they didn't focus on them at all. As I said, it was less "What career are you destined for" and more "How can you go about life exercising the parts of your brain that need it."

And I'd be happy to post my results, though they don't make too much sense without a lot of explanation (I spent almost two hours with one of the test administrators interpreting them), but I'll try to sum up the more interesting parts.

I was in the 10th percentile for Graphoria, which is basically clerical skills (basically: my brain works SIGNIFICANTLY faster than my eyes). This didn't surprise me at all, and they gave me a lot of tips and ideas on how to go through college/life working around tasks that require a lot of visual processing.
I had a moderately high "Ideaphoria" score, which wasn't too surprising either.
I got in the 99th percentile for Foresight, which means that I think almost entirely in long terms. Which I think explains why I thought that getting this test would be so good for my future and everything.
I was in the 65th percentile for inductive reasoning, which was nice. Not as good at Analytical reasoning.
For spatial thinking (the ability to think in three dimensions) I was in the higher average area. Hovering around 55th Percentile. It wasn't my biggest strength and I think more in two dimensions. I got in the 90th percentile for design memory, which indicates higher 2d thinking. That's why they recommended Electrical Engineering.
I was in the average range for everything auditory. Not a strength but not a weakness.
I have terrible color discrimination. 15th percentile.
Generally low dexterity, but tool dexterity was considered average
I have a high vocabulary in both English and mathematics. Not extremely surprising, but very cool to know.

The coolest result I got was that I apparently have an eye for art that is usually only seen by the trained eye. Only 7 percent of testers get the results as I did, and almost all of them had some form of training (usually an art degree). They were very surprised to hear I've never taken an art class in my life.

So that's most of it. They gave me a ton of stuff to look at. If anyone has questions, I'd be glad to answer.
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Old 08-14-2010, 09:50 PM   #32
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You should probably have your cards read, too. Y'know, just to be sure.
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Old 08-14-2010, 11:52 PM   #33
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I'm almost embarrassed by how many times I've switched majors. I'll have two B.Sc. degrees when all's said and done (after eleven years), but the funny thing is, the thing I like doing the most -- programming -- is in neither of those degrees to any significant extent. And yet I do that as part of my daily job, because it turns out you don't really need a comp-sci degree to write programs for most labs, but a degree in the science of that lab's field is absolutely vital. (I'm taking an algorithms course this year, anyway.)
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Old 08-15-2010, 12:05 AM   #34
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Interesting concept and the results sound intriguing, but not something I'd want to spend $700 on. I hope it worked out for you, though.
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Old 08-15-2010, 07:23 AM   #35
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Whunpo, does your school have an architecture program? Everything you described indicates, to me, that you might enjoy that field more so than electrical engineering.
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Old 08-15-2010, 08:58 AM   #36
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Old 08-15-2010, 09:41 AM   #37
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It wasn't an aptitude like that, Scaryfaced. I was tested on math, but on different types of math. And though I did fairly well on them, they didn't focus on them at all. As I said, it was less "What career are you destined for" and more "How can you go about life exercising the parts of your brain that need it."

And I'd be happy to post my results, though they don't make too much sense without a lot of explanation (I spent almost two hours with one of the test administrators interpreting them), but I'll try to sum up the more interesting parts.

I was in the 10th percentile for Graphoria, which is basically clerical skills (basically: my brain works SIGNIFICANTLY faster than my eyes). This didn't surprise me at all, and they gave me a lot of tips and ideas on how to go through college/life working around tasks that require a lot of visual processing.
I had a moderately high "Ideaphoria" score, which wasn't too surprising either.
I got in the 99th percentile for Foresight, which means that I think almost entirely in long terms. Which I think explains why I thought that getting this test would be so good for my future and everything.
I was in the 65th percentile for inductive reasoning, which was nice. Not as good at Analytical reasoning.
For spatial thinking (the ability to think in three dimensions) I was in the higher average area. Hovering around 55th Percentile. It wasn't my biggest strength and I think more in two dimensions. I got in the 90th percentile for design memory, which indicates higher 2d thinking. That's why they recommended Electrical Engineering.
I was in the average range for everything auditory. Not a strength but not a weakness.
I have terrible color discrimination. 15th percentile.
Generally low dexterity, but tool dexterity was considered average
I have a high vocabulary in both English and mathematics. Not extremely surprising, but very cool to know.

The coolest result I got was that I apparently have an eye for art that is usually only seen by the trained eye. Only 7 percent of testers get the results as I did, and almost all of them had some form of training (usually an art degree). They were very surprised to hear I've never taken an art class in my life.

So that's most of it. They gave me a ton of stuff to look at. If anyone has questions, I'd be glad to answer.
After going over your results I've determined you're a clumsy, narrow minded racist who likes to draw out random mathematical algorithms on any surface that will accept graphite, ink or paint. Unfortunately most of it will come out gibberish due to the fact that by the time you finish the first section of anything you wright your brain is so far ahead of what your hand is doing you constantly skip to the end without realizing it leaving the core body of your work vague and unfinished. (thankfully this problem does not follow you to the bedroom.) The good news is that do to your brilliance your answers are almost always right and your peers never second guess your "method" out of fear of looking stupid.


On a serious note I think any positive motivation helping people find direction in their lives is a good thing as long as it's not taken as gospel. Direction is good as long as you still take time to experience what life is like little outside your comfort zone.



EDIT: just in case it's not clear the first portion of my post is a joke.
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Old 08-15-2010, 04:33 PM   #38
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I scored in the top 10 percentile for something called Murderphoria. So... be careful around me.
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Old 08-15-2010, 06:15 PM   #39
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I am under the impression that tech schools tend to expect students to have declared majors upon entry. (And I'm under the impression Whunpo is going to one such a school). The reasoning is fairly simple; if you're at a general ed college with strong general ed requirements, whatever classes you take for your first few semesters will prove useful to you. But if you start out as a computer scientist and then decide you want to be an engineer, most of the CS courses you've taken are 100% useless to you, and you are a year behind in getting your prereqs for the higher level engineering courses, so you'll end up with multiple semesters composed entirely of core classes with large homework requirements -- classes which assume they're the only (or just one of two) courses like that you're taking -- as you approach graduation. It can get ugly fast, and it's 100% bad for your GPA.
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Old 08-15-2010, 06:26 PM   #40
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I think colleges are probably very reluctant to post the statistics but I would guess that students who enter college as undeclared (or "open option" as we call it now) probably have a lower chance of graduating.

I agree with ScaryFaced who mentioned that college is a journey, not a destination. I had a friend who (along with me) attended a "crappy" state college and got an undergrad in political science. If you listened to a lot of people they'd tell you that he was destined for not much. Well, because of his natural skillset and the things he learned in college, he ended up going to a great university for his masters, working briefly for NSA, and now he writes policy for a think tank (he has pictures of him giving presentations to some of the top military brass in the country). Quite an accomplishment for somebody who changed majors, attended what is supposed to be a sub-par school, and got a degree normally associated with fast food or entry-level teaching jobs (not that teaching is bad, my wife is a teacher).

What I don't like is the factory mindset that college is for everybody and you should go the minute you graduate high school. I wish there was a broader focus on "general young adult growth" in this country. Trade schools, service groups, military service, etc, are all viable options that can still lead to a lot of personal growth without spending $20,000 a year on a four year university.

What the universities contrast their option to is the "staying in the basement at Mom and Dad's place working at McDonald's" which is a totally false dichotomy. There are options to explore that do not involve personal stagnation or laziness, they just don't present them to you in high school.
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