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Serapth
12-02-2008, 09:46 PM
Tonight I ran into somethings that resulted in me saying "Shit, I wish I knew that ages ago!". This is the thread for that kind of thing... with using a computer, if you think you know a neat trick or something someone else might benefit from, post it to this thread. Its amazing how learning something simple, like what the Windows Key + 'D' does, can completely change your computer using habits.



Let me get things started...

How many times have you sat at an damned near unresponsive computer, to only look at the task manager and see an SVCHost process using up 100% of one of your cores? You think to yourself, oh great! But what service is it?

I know you can install some wonderful tools like SysInternals PSView, but I hate to install new software, especially if I am trouble shooting on someone elses PC. Anyways, next time you are sitting around trying to figure out WTF service it is that SvcHost is chewing up, do the following.

[Vista instructions, Xp are almost identical]
Open Task Manager either by right clicking your taskbar and choosing Task manager, or CTL+ALT+DEL and select Start Task Manager
Switch to the Processes tab
Click the View->Options->Selection Columns and check PID
Note the SVChost process that is killing your PC, remember the PID
Start a command prompt ( Start->Type "CMD"[enter] )
Type:
tasklist /svc /FI "IMAGENAME eq svchost.exe"

Voila, a list of the services running inside each process ID.


Any tips you can think of to share, add em to this thread.

Expugnare
12-02-2008, 10:06 PM
Or even easier, right click on the individual svchost.exe in question and select Go to Process(es) and it should switch over to the services tab and highlight everything being run by that process.

Another tip: Ctrl+Shift+Esc starts Task Manager directly.

Serapth
12-02-2008, 10:09 PM
Or even easier, right click on the individual svchost.exe in question and select Go to Process(es) and it should switch over to the services tab and highlight everything being run by that process.

Another tip: Ctrl+Shift+Esc starts Task Manager directly.

Oh neat x2

Rogue_hunter
12-02-2008, 10:12 PM
Another tip: Ctrl+Shift+Esc starts Task Manager directly.

That's nice to know in Vista, since Ctrl+Alt+Del doesn't bring up the Task Manager anymore.

Serapth
12-02-2008, 10:13 PM
This one is for a very very limited set of people.

Did you (stupidly!!!) agree to try out IE 8 Beta? Notice you can't delete your f'ing history? Yeah, its epically stupid, a bug and hopefully will be fixed SOON! Seeing as its been two months now for me, soon isn't soon enough. Unfortunately, the fix sucks.

Control Panel -> Indexing Options -> Advanced -> Rebuild ( and wait.. )

Better yet, stay the hell away from IE8. This coming from one of this sites biggest MS cheerleaders.

Serapth
12-02-2008, 10:14 PM
That's nice to know in Vista, since Ctrl+Alt+Del doesn't bring up the Task Manager anymore.

It does for me. Do you have UAC running still?

OldeWolf
12-02-2008, 10:15 PM
Computing: Did you know that Fire Fox > IE? :p

Serapth
12-02-2008, 10:18 PM
Computing: Did you know that Fire Fox > IE? :p

FireFox has more then its fair share of problems. I swore by Opera until 9.x was released. IE8 is horrifically flawed, Firefox is pretty solid but still full of its fair share of issues ( mem leaks being a big one, incompatibility being an increasingly minor one ).

Lately I have been using Google Chrome for 95% of my daily browsing and I am quite impressed. Not working with hotmail is the biggest downside. Considering Firefox works just fine with Hotmail, I think it may actually be Google doing the evil here, regardless to their do no evil policy.

That said, I have all 5 browsers installed, basically because I have to.

Typical Michael
12-02-2008, 10:19 PM
control shift escape please.

Adam Blue
12-02-2008, 10:24 PM
It does for me. Do you have UAC running still?

He might mean straight to it, as the original method brings up a menu to select the TM.

Rogue_hunter
12-02-2008, 10:24 PM
It does for me. Do you have UAC running still?

No, and I've never found any option to change what Ctrl+Alt+Del does. Vista Home Premium, and UAC has been turned off since day one.

Tip that may or may not speed up system boot: Enable the "NOGUIBOOT" option via msconfig in the "boot" tab. XP boots up faster, but Vista still gives you an image while booting, so it doesn't do much.

Tip for suckers: ReadyBoost in Vista is utterly useless unless you have 256-512 MB of RAM. If you have 1 GB or higher, there is no performance boost. If you have 256 or 512 MB, you need to upgrade, and ReadyBoost won't do much for you.
I only impart this because I have had to upgrade a few systems because people thought that they could save money by getting the lowest amount of RAM and using their 32 MB flash drives. Awesomely stupid.

NSFW
12-03-2008, 02:30 AM
Can this be a question / answer thread? I know next to nothing about the practical side of knowing how to run my computer. I would like to know enough that I never require someone else to fix it.

Lon Lon Rabbit
12-03-2008, 03:16 AM
I had a tech guy over once and he typed something into the command prompt (xp) which brought up a list of applications which run on startup, and you can just tick/untick the boxes next to them to easily change what will and won't run.

What is that command?

Disgustipated
12-03-2008, 03:20 AM
I had a tech guy over once and he typed something into the command prompt (xp) which brought up a list of applications which run on startup, and you can just tick/untick the boxes next to them to easily change what will and won't run.

What is that command?

Go to Start --> Run --> And type in "msconfig"

BLeeP
12-03-2008, 03:22 AM
I had a tech guy over once and he typed something into the command prompt (xp) which brought up a list of applications which run on startup, and you can just tick/untick the boxes next to them to easily change what will and won't run.

What is that command?

Go into the run box and type msconfig. That should do it.

EDIT: Ah, damn. Next time I should just post without actually reading the thread 8-P.

Jeffool
12-03-2008, 03:43 AM
For bonus points:

Check that startup list against a site like this (http://www.sysinfo.org/startuplist.php), and see what kind of shit you've got running on your PC.

(Note: If something isn't listed, google it. I could be important.)

Lon Lon Rabbit
12-03-2008, 03:43 AM
Awesome thanks you two, that's the one. Very handy for my PC and this laptop which have an unbelievable amount of stuff built up over the years that they now start with that I just plain don't need.

EDIT: Thanks Jeffool too, that looks useful.

DangerousDaze
12-03-2008, 03:45 AM
No, and I've never found any option to change what Ctrl+Alt+Del does.

You never will because CTRL+ALT+DEL is an untrappable Windows event. It's been made that way so that no one can spoof a login screen. I.e. since you need to hit CTRL-ALT-DEL to begin the login process you'd know immediately if you weren't at the genuine login page.

/edit - Here's a great guide (http://lifehacker.com/5087101/the-complete-guide-to-speeding-up-your-pcs-startup) to speeding up Windows startup.

Ancalagon
12-03-2008, 04:32 AM
FireFox has more then its fair share of problems. I swore by Opera until 9.x was released. IE8 is horrifically flawed, Firefox is pretty solid but still full of its fair share of issues ( mem leaks being a big one, incompatibility being an increasingly minor one ).

Lately I have been using Google Chrome for 95% of my daily browsing and I am quite impressed. Not working with hotmail is the biggest downside. Considering Firefox works just fine with Hotmail, I think it may actually be Google doing the evil here, regardless to their do no evil policy.

That said, I have all 5 browsers installed, basically because I have to.

Its not Google, the same thing happened with FireFox 3. When users of FireFox 3 changed their user agent string to something else, it worked fine. Its Hotmail that checks browser versions badly.

As for memory leaks... my Firefox 3 on my XP work machine takes up a lot of mem, but then I never have less than 10 tabs open. My Firefox 3 on Vista at home is always fine and fast.

H.Bogard
12-03-2008, 05:01 AM
Anyone know how to get rid of useless shite in Vista that I won't use?

Movie Maker (I'll take my advanced/professional programs over this noob piece of shit, thank you).

Windows Mail (Ironic that it doesn't support Microsoft's own fucking email service (Hotmail))

Media Center (Don't need it)

Meeting space, Photo gallery, SO MUCH MORE! I want it all flushed! And not a single damn option in the add/remove windows components section. Ugh.

Zrikz
12-03-2008, 08:58 AM
Oh man, Ctrl shift esc is amazing. It was annoying right clicking on my taskbar / ctrl alt del, especially since I got rid of it =/

Goronmon
12-03-2008, 09:02 AM
...UAC has been turned off since day one.Why would you do this?

Voodoo
12-03-2008, 10:32 AM
These are IT related instead of PC related...

-It is often a good practice to self-reference DNS #1 (127.0.0.1) on an MS active directory controllers when configuring their DNS settings.

-The use of a spam proxy between the internet and your email server is the best setup rather than using spam cleaning software on the clients.

-When setting up a wireless network for a business, a stand-alone RADIUS account server along with the use of WPA (TKIP) at the access points is an extremely good idea. The access points also shouldn't broadcast and MAC filtering should be turned on.

-If you need to setup multiple business locations using VPN-based WAN connections, it is highly advised to use low wattage embedded hardware firewalls with encryption co-processors.

-The use of virtual machines in a server environment is becoming more beneficial as time progresses. Just make sure you properly back them up as well as use the snapshot ability.

-If you are a network administrator, be sure you always are testing your recovery from tape method. The worst realization is when you have to recover from backup only to discover that the backups are no good due to electromagnetic fields near the storage area, your inventory tracking of their contents isn't as good as you thought or you aren't really backing stuff up. ;)

-Another related to backups; get familiar with the Tower of Hanoi concept when dealing with backup tapes. It is awesome!

Serapth
12-03-2008, 10:50 AM
Hey Voodoo, I have a question for you.

I have a single server ( Win 2k3, primary PDC, SQL, DNS, DHCP ) setup at home. Thing is, I am not running firewall or NAT.

That said, since the update my Xbox is reporting strict NAT. My modem/router(same device ) is properly configured and everything works fine. UGH.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 11:00 AM
The command line in quest for services is "sc query". SC is extremely powerful.

Process Explorer is superior to PSView in a lot of ways.

Serapth, are you sure your ISP has no firewall?

Serapth
12-03-2008, 11:20 AM
The command line in quest for services is "sc query". SC is extremely powerful.

Process Explorer is superior to PSView in a lot of ways.

Serapth, are you sure your ISP has no firewall?

They never used to. Besides, I am running a fixed IP, and have email, etc running and things have worked just fine. It seems to be linked to the update to Xbox live, but that doesn't make a ton of sense. Short of calling my ISP, would there be a way to verify?

You are right, SC is awesome. Only way I know of to remotely start a service.

sc START time \\computer servicename

Voodoo
12-03-2008, 11:27 AM
Hey Voodoo, I have a question for you.

I have a single server ( Win 2k3, primary PDC, SQL, DNS, DHCP ) setup at home. Thing is, I am not running firewall or NAT.

That said, since the update my Xbox is reporting strict NAT. My modem/router(same device ) is properly configured and everything works fine. UGH.

How are you routing packets between your private network and the ISP (internet)?

Serapth
12-03-2008, 11:36 AM
How are you routing packets between your private network and the ISP (internet)?

Via my gateway, my DSL modem ( a GS8100 ), using NAT/Port Forwarding.

IP Filtering is set to none, the ports are open and forwarding properly and NAT is set to lowest security.

It used to work just fine. Adding insult to injury, if I set it up to use DHCP, do a fresh connection ( so the old IP is replaced ), reforward the ports via NAT in my modem to the newly acquired IP address it works fine, for a bit. Also, all other connections work just fine, I can connect, download, chat, etc...

Up until the update, I was running using a fixed IP, port forwarding via my modem and everything looked fine. Now, it doesn't work. Searching the net seems to show a number of people are having difficulty with fixed IP's, but none of the solutions work.

TheKeck
12-03-2008, 11:41 AM
You never will because CTRL+ALT+DEL is an untrappable Windows event. It's been made that way so that no one can spoof a login screen. I.e. since you need to hit CTRL-ALT-DEL to begin the login process you'd know immediately if you weren't at the genuine login page.
Well, except for the fact that in XP CTRL-ALT-DEL either brings up the task manager or... that other page, depending on if you have fast user switching enabled or not.

In Vista, you can only get... that other page. It makes The Keck a sad monkey. I am so used to using C-A-D for task manager, I never remember I have to use CTRL-SH-ESC in Vista. :(

Voodoo
12-03-2008, 11:46 AM
Via my gateway, my DSL modem ( a GS8100 ), using NAT/Port Forwarding.

IP Filtering is set to none, the ports are open and forwarding properly and NAT is set to lowest security.

It used to work just fine. Adding insult to injury, if I set it up to use DHCP, do a fresh connection ( so the old IP is replaced ), reforward the ports via NAT in my modem to the newly acquired IP address it works fine, for a bit. Also, all other connections work just fine, I can connect, download, chat, etc...

Up until the update, I was running using a fixed IP, port forwarding via my modem and everything looked fine. Now, it doesn't work. Searching the net seems to show a number of people are having difficulty with fixed IP's, but none of the solutions work.

On your private network, are you assigning IP addresses via static or DHCP? Also, on the 360, after the update did you verify that it is still using a static address (if you had it on a static private IP that is). I've read and saw myself that it resets to use DHCP after the update.

Bone
12-03-2008, 12:00 PM
Why would you do this?

I assume because people get tired of being asked "are you sure?" every time they want to do... anything. I realize turning it off reduces you to XP-level security, but from the limited time I spent on someone else's Vista, those UAC prompts were out of control.

Goronmon
12-03-2008, 12:09 PM
I assume because people get tired of being asked "are you sure?" every time they want to do... anything. I realize turning it off reduces you to XP-level security, but from the limited time I spent on someone else's Vista, those UAC prompts were out of control.Most of the problem lies in applications built around the broken account system used by XP. Other than that, I find it hardly any different than using "sudo" in linux. And it's much easier than managing multiple accounts with various permission levels. Sure, the prompt isn't the greatest thing ever, but the slight time savings gained by turning UAC off definitely does not make up for the loss in security for your system.

TheKeck
12-03-2008, 12:13 PM
Most of the problem lies in applications built around the broken account system used by XP. Other than that, I find it hardly any different than using "sudo" in linux. And it's much easier than managing multiple accounts with various permission levels. Sure, the prompt isn't the greatest thing ever, but the slight time savings gained by turning UAC off definitely does not make up for the loss in security for your system.
This discussion again? What the hell security am I worried about on my home system? Answer... none.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 12:13 PM
Also, as of SP1, the prompts from the UAC are drastically reduced. I have the UAC on all my machines at this point.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 12:14 PM
This discussion again? What the hell security am I worried about on my home system? Answer... none.

Oh good, so you don't care about the rest of the internet then? This attitude makes me palpably angry. I blame you and people like you for the botnets that exist in the world. It's one thing to be ignorant of technology and security, and it's another to be willfully ignorant.

Bone
12-03-2008, 12:14 PM
Most of the problem lies in applications built around the broken account system used by XP. Other than that, I find it hardly any different than using "sudo" in linux. And it's much easier than managing multiple accounts with various permission levels. Sure, the prompt isn't the greatest thing ever, but the slight time savings gained by turning UAC off definitely does not make up for the loss in security for your system.

Yeah, I'm still on XP so I can't weigh in more than I did above. I'm just coming from the perspective of the typical user (who doesn't know sudo from sumo) who doesn't want to see a bunch of popups. I hear that Symantec's suite for Vista make an improvement by handling UAC events mostly automatically and therefore removing the popups from users while maintaining security.

Goronmon
12-03-2008, 12:17 PM
This discussion again? What the hell security am I worried about on my home system? Answer... none.Aside from torre's comments about zombie systems, do you never ever access any form of private data from your home system? I find that hard to believe.

DangerousDaze
12-03-2008, 12:18 PM
Well, except for the fact that in XP CTRL-ALT-DEL either brings up the task manager or... that other page, depending on if you have fast user switching enabled or not.

That's fine. The point is that it's totally under control of Windows and can't ever be trapped by developers to do anything else. It's a fundamental cornerstone of Windows security (yeah, don't laugh!).

Voodoo
12-03-2008, 12:22 PM
Yeah, I'm still on XP so I can't weigh in more than I did above. I'm just coming from the perspective of the typical user (who doesn't know sudo from sumo) who doesn't want to see a bunch of popups. I hear that Symantec's suite for Vista make an improvement by handling UAC events mostly automatically and therefore removing the popups from users while maintaining security.

A home user whom has had to pay excessive service fees for the help needed to cleanup a false sense of security I find not to have a problem with the UAC pop-ups once they are properly explained.

The majority of home users do not use an anti-malware product or if they do it isn't updating any longer or never did; and they are mostly ignorant of both facts.

You [must realize] are in a very strong minority of home computer users.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 12:23 PM
Aside from torre's comments about zombie systems, do you never ever access any form of private data from your home system? I find that hard to believe.

What are you talking about? No one is ever victim of identity theft! (http://www.spamlaws.com/id-theft-statistics.html)

Serapth
12-03-2008, 12:23 PM
On your private network, are you assigning IP addresses via static or DHCP? Also, on the 360, after the update did you verify that it is still using a static address (if you had it on a static private IP that is). I've read and saw myself that it resets to use DHCP after the update.

I am running DHCP on my server for the various machines on my network.

I have tried the Xbox 360 with just about very update possible, fixed IP, static IP, fixed IP with automatically assigned DNS, fixed ip with fixed DNS, etc... I have even shutdown dhcpserver, started 360 and got a dhcp address from the modem, kept dhcpserver shut down and assigned a fixed IP. Every scenario I can think of and it fails. Except the once in a lifetime when I have it set to automatic IP, set it assign a new IP then shutdown my dhcpserver, restart my modem/router, setup new entries in NAT to point to the newly assigned IP address and it *MIGHT* work. Problem is, as soon as its assigned a new IP its back to broken again, regardless to me updating the NAT info to the new ip.


driving me nuts. Oh, and if I let my friend host the CO-OP session in GoW2, everything works just fine.

Oh, and its GoW 2 that is saying my

Serapth
12-03-2008, 12:27 PM
Also, as of SP1, the prompts from the UAC are drastically reduced. I have the UAC on all my machines at this point.

UAC and development tools don't work great together. Worst part is, its not a matter of working or not working... 98% word, but the 2% that don't work are completely non-obvious and lead to hours of headsratching.

After wasting about 10 hours researching problems that ended up being UAC related ( actually, not being Admin related to be more accurate ), I gave up on it and got rid of it. Ran into a number of other problems with WCF services, but I am a rather specialized case.

Serapth
12-03-2008, 12:28 PM
Oh, I did learn a lesson lately. Windows Defender and AVG don't play well together. If your computer gets brutally slow, look to see if its the Windows Defender service.

That is one piece of Vista I am not impressed with.

Raen
12-03-2008, 12:29 PM
Oh, I did learn a lesson lately. Windows Defender and AVG don't play well together. If your computer gets brutally slow, look to see if its the Windows Defender service.

That is one piece of Vista I am not impressed with.

Really? I have AVG and Windows Defender running (no idea why actually) and my laptop runs fine.

Bone
12-03-2008, 12:34 PM
A home user whom has had to pay excessive service fees for the help needed to cleanup a false sense of security I find not to have a problem with the UAC pop-ups once they are properly explained.

The majority of home users do not use an anti-malware product or if they do it isn't updating any longer or never did; and they are mostly ignorant of both facts.

You [must realize] are in a very strong minority of home computer users.
I am confused by the wording of this post. I think you are saying you don't mind the pop-ups, and that I'm a minority for knowing much about my Windows system (I agree with this).

What I meant to say originally was that in my experiences with other, non-experienced Windows users, they are unhappy with a system that asks them all the time if they are sure they want to do something. Because each pop-up message is basically forcing them to learn way more about their system than they care to, which means they either call me (for free) or a service company who can tell them, yes, it's OK to install that program you're installing.

So, while the system is designed to protect especially the users who don't know their system, in the end it seems to alienate them. It may make them averse to doing anything on their system for fear of being challenged by their computer. The flipside of this is that they may become jaded to UAC and just answer Yes, always.

Serapth
12-03-2008, 12:37 PM
Really? I have AVG and Windows Defender running (no idea why actually) and my laptop runs fine.

Just wait... or, you aren't running the same version of AVG, or the same patch level I am at. avgsrvx.exe and windows defender got into a fight over some resource and win defender didnt deal with it well, spooling up to 100% core usage. Has happened a few times. I also encountered something similar with Windows Defender and Avaste.

Finally, WD offers duplicate behavour to other software I am running, so its mostly just a waste of resources.

Raen
12-03-2008, 12:44 PM
Just wait... or, you aren't running the same version of AVG, or the same patch level I am at. avgsrvx.exe and windows defender got into a fight over some resource and win defender didnt deal with it well, spooling up to 100% core usage. Has happened a few times. I also encountered something similar with Windows Defender and Avaste.

Well been using them both for a month (in fact running right now) and they're both on the latest updates.

squirrelTactics
12-03-2008, 12:47 PM
Go to Start --> Run --> And type in "msconfig"

windows key + R opens up the run window. I use it all the time to open up quick applications like notepad and the calculator.

Likewise, there are a whole bunch of windows key shortcuts that I didn't know about until a year or so ago

windows key + D goes to desktop
windows key + tab (in vista) does that window rotation thingie

Voodoo
12-03-2008, 12:55 PM
I am confused by the wording of this post. I think you are saying you don't mind the pop-ups, and that I'm a minority for knowing much about my Windows system (I agree with this).

What I meant to say originally was that in my experiences with other, non-experienced Windows users, they are unhappy with a system that asks them all the time if they are sure they want to do something. Because each pop-up message is basically forcing them to learn way more about their system than they care to, which means they either call me (for free) or a service company who can tell them, yes, it's OK to install that program you're installing.

So, while the system is designed to protect especially the users who don't know their system, in the end it seems to alienate them. It may make them averse to doing anything on their system for fear of being challenged by their computer. The flipside of this is that they may become jaded to UAC and just answer Yes, always.

Quite right. I agree with your assessment too. I apologize for my confusing way with words.

Also, I wasn't describing myself when referring to the pop-ups I was instead referring to the people that may not have proper protection on their PCs, get infected and then have to pay to get it all cleaned up. Often, I find, those people don't get annoyed as quickly as others when having to deal with an extra level of system security. Those that you describe, though, are just as bad as the people that never read the OK/Cancel pop-up boxes. ;)

Goronmon
12-03-2008, 12:59 PM
It may make them averse to doing anything on their system for fear of being challenged by their computer.On some level, this is a good thing. People should be wary of installing every bullshit app/plugin/tool that the internet tells them to.

Bone
12-03-2008, 01:08 PM
Quite right. I agree with your assessment too. I apologize for my confusing way with words.

Also, I wasn't describing myself when referring to the pop-ups I was instead referring to the people that may not have proper protection on their PCs, get infected and then have to pay to get it all cleaned up. Often, I find, those people don't get annoyed as quickly as others when having to deal with an extra level of system security. Those that you describe, though, are just as bad as the people that never read the OK/Cancel pop-up boxes. ;)
Yeah. I think the problem is that there is no good solution, still. Either they become paranoid and think every single action of the computer is a hacker or virus (I know these people) or they ignore all warnings and pretend virii don't exist until the machine won't even run (I know them too).

On some level, this is a good thing. People should be wary of installing every bullshit app/plugin/tool that the internet tells them to.I warn my parents every time I see them, yet I still have to uninstall whatever retarded Search Bar (plus popups!) is installed in their web browser. Every time I see them.

Serapth
12-03-2008, 01:32 PM
First person that pops in this thread and says the answer is to "Buy a Mac!" is going to get neutered with a butter knife!

Rogue_hunter
12-03-2008, 04:33 PM
Why would you do this?

Because I know exactly what programs I'm installing and when. I'm the only person using the system, and I run anti-spyware and trojan scans monthly, so I have no need for 6 different popups when I'm trying to install one game. This is only on my personal system. For the general user, I advise them to keep it on, and only to say yes whenever they're installing something and to always click no if it randomly pops up when they're not installing stuff.


EDIT: forgot to add another tip.
This only works in Vista, but every shortcut in the taskbar is assigned a number. You can start them up by pressing Windows Key + 1-9 and 0, with 1 being the shortcut closest to the Start button and 0 being the last one. Instead of having to move your mouse over and click, you can just hit Windows + number key to start the program.

Wraith
12-03-2008, 04:57 PM
This may be a bit "computing 101," so I'm a little ashamed I didn't know about it until a few years ago... (Or I did learn it at some earlier point, but then forgot about it.)

In pretty much any application where you enter text (be it Word, notepad, Firefox, Visual Studio, whatever), pressing CTRL+right arrow or CTRL+left arrow will skip to the next/previous "word" in your text. Much, much faster than just holding down the arrow key to move through individual characters, or having to use the mouse.

diablopath
12-03-2008, 05:01 PM
One common point of ignorance I see with people lately is they don't understand that a 32bit maxes out at recognizing 3GB of RAM.

I tried for one hour last night to explain why the motherboard had a max capacity of 8GB, but in his situation he would only benefit from having 3GB. -.-

TheKeck
12-03-2008, 05:05 PM
One common point of ignorance I see with people lately is they don't understand that a 32bit maxes out at recognizing 3GB of RAM.

I tried for one hour last night to explain why the motherboard had a max capacity of 8GB, but in his situation he would only benefit from having 3GB. -.-
Roughly 3GB, varying depending on what else they've got. ;)

Bad Buddha
12-03-2008, 05:07 PM
windows key + R opens up the run window. I use it all the time to open up quick applications like notepad and the calculator.

Yay! I never knew! That is so handy! I'm always running cmd at work. Now I just need to train myself to use it!

I'm sure I've seen lists of all this stuff before, but I get so set in my ways that I don't apply myself to learn and use it. :o

Serapth
12-03-2008, 05:09 PM
One common point of ignorance I see with people lately is they don't understand that a 32bit maxes out at recognizing 3GB of RAM.

I tried for one hour last night to explain why the motherboard had a max capacity of 8GB, but in his situation he would only benefit from having 3GB. -.-

This is actually wrong.

Its simple math in a sense, 32 bit addressing is about to address 2^32 ( 2 to the power of 32 ) unique addresses, or 4, 294, 967, 296 bytes. Also known as 4 gigs.

Thing is, with win32, they virtualized memory addressing and limit each process to at most 2 gigs of memory. Another major gotcha is video memory. See, even if you have 4 gigs of RAM on your 32 bit OS, say you have another 512MB of video ram... how is that memory going to be accessed if all 4 294 967 296 different addresses are already taken? Answer is, they cant and ironically enough, tons of video ram can actually kill your performance on a 32bit OS.

Wraith
12-03-2008, 05:10 PM
Windows + L = Lock Computer.

TheKeck
12-03-2008, 05:13 PM
This is actually wrong.

Its simple math in a sense, 32 bit addressing is about to address 2^32 ( 2 to the power of 32 ) unique addresses, or 4, 294, 967, 296 bytes. Also known as 4 gigs.

Thing is, with win32, they virtualized memory addressing and limit each process to at most 2 gigs of memory. Another major gotcha is video memory. See, even if you have 4 gigs of RAM on your 32 bit OS, say you have another 512MB of video ram... how is that memory going to be accessed if all 4 294 967 296 different addresses are already taken? Answer is, they cant and ironically enough, tons of video ram can actually kill your performance on a 32bit OS.
I said it a lot more succinctly.

Of course you said it a lot more better. :p

Serapth
12-03-2008, 05:14 PM
One thing that is scary who few people realize. You all know Alt-Tab flips through processes, but so many people don't seem to realize ALT+SHIFT+Tab go the other way.

Oh, and in the theme of Windows key combos.

Win + N opens notepad, unless you have onenote installed, which frankly you should as its fucking awesome.

Also, WinKey + a number == your quick launch bar. For example, my quicklaunch first item is IE. So Win + 1 == Launch IE.

TheKeck
12-03-2008, 05:21 PM
EDIT: forgot to add another tip.
This only works in Vista, but every shortcut in the taskbar is assigned a number. You can start them up by pressing Windows Key + 1-9 and 0, with 1 being the shortcut closest to the Start button and 0 being the last one. Instead of having to move your mouse over and click, you can just hit Windows + number key to start the program.

Also, WinKey + a number == your quick launch bar. For example, my quicklaunch first item is IE. So Win + 1 == Launch IE.
Talking about the same thing here, right?

Serapth
12-03-2008, 05:22 PM
Talking about the same thing here, right?

No, of course not!
Well, maybe, ok, yes.

TheKeck
12-03-2008, 05:26 PM
No, of course not!
Well, maybe, ok, yes.
Now I have to ask, though, is this Vista only or something? I'm trying it on my XP computer at work, and it doesn't seem to do anything.

I'll also add that Windows Key-E brings up a windows explorer.

Rogue_hunter
12-03-2008, 05:28 PM
Now I have to ask, though, is this Vista only or something? I'm trying it on my XP computer at work, and it doesn't seem to do anything.

Yeah, Vista only. When I first figured it out on Vista, I immediately tried it in XP to no avail.

Bad Buddha
12-03-2008, 05:31 PM
This will work with just about any system:

If you spend the whole weekend playing computer games, your spouse will get really pissed at you.


PowerMenu (http://www.abstractpath.com/powermenu/) is a great little utility that adds a ton of extra selections and contextual functions to the right-click control menu.

J Arcane
12-03-2008, 05:53 PM
First person that pops in this thread and says the answer is to "Buy a Mac!" is going to get neutered with a butter knife!

I think referencing any *Nix based OS is probably salient when discussing a feature that wouldn't be necessary if Windows security wasn't a fucking joke.

Serapth
12-03-2008, 05:58 PM
I think referencing any *Nix based OS is probably salient when discussing a feature that wouldn't be necessary if Windows security wasn't a fucking joke.

Frankly, until the last generation of OSs, security didn't mean shit.

J Arcane
12-03-2008, 06:09 PM
Frankly, until the last generation of OSs, security didn't mean shit.
The current boom in malware wouldn't even exist to the level it does if Microsoft's OSes hadn't been so consistently shite from version to version from the word go.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 06:11 PM
I think referencing any *Nix based OS is probably salient when discussing a feature that wouldn't be necessary if Windows security wasn't a fucking joke.

This strikes me as totally offbase. Any *NIX would have the same problem without separation of permissions. You don't run as root for a reason. Also, 2000 called, and they want their security statistics back. XP and Vista have seen very few security escalations in recent years.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 06:13 PM
The current boom in malware wouldn't even exist to the level it does if Microsoft's OSes had been so consistently shite from version to version from the word go.

But this is sorta true.

J Arcane
12-03-2008, 06:18 PM
This strikes me as totally offbase. Any *NIX would have the same problem without separation of permissions. You don't run as root for a reason. Also, 2000 called, and they want their security statistics back. XP and Vista have seen very few security escalations in recent years.

UAC is not the same thing as a proper account setup on a *nix box. It's a hack.

And I'm still seeing plenty of malware by the boatload coming in on a regular basis at the shop I do my computing at. Hell, one of our ISPs recently had to start shutting off people's connections because of a massive email bomb.

But this is sorta true.

I really wish it weren't. DirectX is really the only real gaming platform for computers, and I like computer games. OpenGL is a dinosaur, and even iD is abandoning it after trying like hell to champion it's cause for a good decade or more.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 06:21 PM
UAC is not the same thing as a proper account setup on a *nix box. It's a hack.

And I'm still seeing plenty of malware by the boatload coming in on a regular basis at the shop I do my computing at. Hell, one of our ISPs recently had to start shutting off people's connections because of a massive email bomb.


That's completely untrue. It's not a hack at all. It's implemented at the lowest levels. I really don't know where you get this. Of course you still see malware...Vista isn't exactly a huge chunk of the marketshare.

*Edit*

Also...I firmly believe Microsoft rectified their mistakes with Vista. It's a great architecture. It's on par with any other OS out there, especially with PowerShell (Which beats out BASH, IMHO)

J Arcane
12-03-2008, 06:24 PM
That's completely untrue. It's not a hack at all. It's implemented at the lowest levels. I really don't know where you get this. Of course you still see malware...Vista isn't exactly a huge chunk of the marketshare.

*Edit*

Also...I firmly believe Microsoft rectified their mistakes with Vista. It's a great architecture. It's on par with any other OS out there, especially with PowerShell (Which beats out BASH, IMHO)
I can't "turn off" the permissions system in a *nix OS short of just running as root all the time.

If MS were serious about revamping the way Vista handles users and priveledges, they should've at least done something like what Ubuntu does.

Of course, they can't really do that either, because unlike on a *nix OS you can't count on any given program not trying to access things regular programs never should've been allowed access to in the first bloody place.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 06:35 PM
Yeah, life is easy when every kernel version breaks support for legacy programs. Enterprise software is much harder. Also, expect a massively improved UAC in Windows 7.

J Arcane
12-03-2008, 06:38 PM
Yeah, life is easy when every kernel version breaks support for legacy programs. Enterprise software is much harder. Also, expect a massively improved UAC in Windows 7.
What I've really been hoping to see for some time was basically the Windows equivalent to OS X. Just ditch the legacy shit completely, and use a VM or something for backwards compatibility, and rebuild from the ground up, and do it right this time. Hell, if necessary, call in some of that SCO clout and make it a *nix based OS too.

It'd be harder without direct control over the hardware to pull it off like Apple did, but then again, they managed to get away with forcing hardware upgrades with Vista (though some companies snuck through just barely).

Serapth
12-03-2008, 06:39 PM
I can't "turn off" the permissions system in a *nix OS short of just running as root all the time.

My latest *nix experience ( my EEE PC ), turning off the permission system was a checkbox away from the default install. No more or less then vista. Actually, less, as atleast with Vista I had to google it.

As Linux gets more and more user focused, it gets less and less secure. For a good reason too, as all UI design is basically a balance between security and user friendly.

Serapth
12-03-2008, 06:40 PM
What I've really been hoping to see for some time was basically the Windows equivalent to OS X. Just ditch the legacy shit completely, and use a VM or something for backwards compatibility, and rebuild from the ground up.

It'd be harder without direct control over the hardware, but then again, they managed to get away with forcing hardware upgrades with Vista (though some companies snuck through just barely).

FYI, from Win95 on, all backward compatibility was actually done in a VM. Since switching to the NT4 kernel ( NT4, Win 2K, XP, etc ), Win 98/95/Dos have all been run in a VM of sorts.

torrefaction
12-03-2008, 06:44 PM
I'm so glad you have no architectural control over Windows J Arcane. But then, I get the feeling you don't work in the development industry.

Voodoo
12-04-2008, 08:15 AM
This is actually wrong.

Its simple math in a sense, 32 bit addressing is about to address 2^32 ( 2 to the power of 32 ) unique addresses, or 4, 294, 967, 296 bytes. Also known as 4 gigs.

Thing is, with win32, they virtualized memory addressing and limit each process to at most 2 gigs of memory. Another major gotcha is video memory. See, even if you have 4 gigs of RAM on your 32 bit OS, say you have another 512MB of video ram... how is that memory going to be accessed if all 4 294 967 296 different addresses are already taken? Answer is, they cant and ironically enough, tons of video ram can actually kill your performance on a 32bit OS.

This is correct and I will only expand in explaining the 'why' portion.

All memory on expansion cards is mapped to the end of addressable memory. So, for example, you have yourself a 256MB video card and a 128MB raid card, that 384MB's of memory will be mapped to the end of the addressable memory space.

In a 32-bit environment, the max amount of addressable memory is 4096MB. So, in essence, if you have 4096MB (4GB) of main memory and a 8800GT with 512MB then you will only be able to use 3,584MB (~3.5GB) of your main memory because any memory mapped to expansion cards are reserved.

Also, the performance difference that you'll have on a system with 4096MB vs 3584MB of main memory is extremely slight. This is especially so on a 32-bit OS because (as previously said) processes are limited to use of 2048MB of RAM. If the loss of 512MB of main memory bothers you a lot, just switch to a 64bit OS. The memory on those expansion cards will once again be mapped to the end of addressable memory and it is highly doubtful that you'd ever reach their space in the near future.

Voodoo
12-04-2008, 08:17 AM
I am running DHCP on my server for the various machines on my network.

I have tried the Xbox 360 with just about very update possible, fixed IP, static IP, fixed IP with automatically assigned DNS, fixed ip with fixed DNS, etc... I have even shutdown dhcpserver, started 360 and got a dhcp address from the modem, kept dhcpserver shut down and assigned a fixed IP. Every scenario I can think of and it fails. Except the once in a lifetime when I have it set to automatic IP, set it assign a new IP then shutdown my dhcpserver, restart my modem/router, setup new entries in NAT to point to the newly assigned IP address and it *MIGHT* work. Problem is, as soon as its assigned a new IP its back to broken again, regardless to me updating the NAT info to the new ip.


driving me nuts. Oh, and if I let my friend host the CO-OP session in GoW2, everything works just fine.

Oh, and its GoW 2 that is saying my

Do you have the ability to place the X360 in a DMZ with that modem? I would suggest that if it even fails at this setup, I'd talk to your ISP and perhaps ask for a replacement device.

Serapth
12-04-2008, 08:55 AM
Do you have the ability to place the X360 in a DMZ with that modem? I would suggest that if it even fails at this setup, I'd talk to your ISP and perhaps ask for a replacement device.

I can't actually tell, its the most obscure modem I have ever seen.

I assume so, as it shows DMZ as one of the parameters under IP Filtering, but the hell if I understand it. I see nowhere within the interface to specify dmz settings.

I can't exchange the modem, I own it unfortunately.

Bone
12-04-2008, 11:00 AM
This is correct and I will only expand in explaining the 'why' portion.

All memory on expansion cards is mapped to the end of addressable memory. So, for example, you have yourself a 256MB video card and a 128MB raid card, that 384MB's of memory will be mapped to the end of the addressable memory space.

In a 32-bit environment, the max amount of addressable memory is 4096MB. So, in essence, if you have 4096MB (4GB) of main memory and a 8800GT with 512MB then you will only be able to use 3,584MB (~3.5GB) of your main memory because any memory mapped to expansion cards are reserved.

Also, the performance difference that you'll have on a system with 4096MB vs 3584MB of main memory is extremely slight. This is especially so on a 32-bit OS because (as previously said) processes are limited to use of 2048MB of RAM. If the loss of 512MB of main memory bothers you a lot, just switch to a 64bit OS. The memory on those expansion cards will once again be mapped to the end of addressable memory and it is highly doubtful that you'd ever reach their space in the near future.
That's the most concise explanation I've seen of that yet. And it's a good argument to actually run 4 GB of RAM in dual channel rather than 3 GB in single channel mode. You won't lose much of the 4 GB and you'll get the bus speed benefit of two physical channels of RAM.

LiquidRain
12-04-2008, 12:17 PM
Frankly, until the last generation of OSs, security didn't mean shit.
If you were a home user, maybe. I think systems administrators and any internet services would argue differently.

I can't "turn off" the permissions system in a *nix OS short of just running as root all the time.
visudo

liquidrain ALL=NOPASSWD: ALL

If MS were serious about revamping the way Vista handles users and priveledges, they should've at least done something like what Ubuntu does.
Which isn't hard to circumvent if you really want to. See above.

Of course, they can't really do that either, because unlike on a *nix OS you can't count on any given program not trying to access things regular programs never should've been allowed access to in the first bloody place.
It NEVER happens. (http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=08/02/10/2011257) No. Never.

Yeah, life is easy when every kernel version breaks support for legacy programs. Enterprise software is much harder. Also, expect a massively improved UAC in Windows 7.
So you don't upgrade kernels. You stick on Debian Stable or RHEL or SLES and get the security fix backports and the stability.

Linux and OS X, via UNIX/POSIX, inherited better security and permissions so it tends to work better since developers are far more familiar with the limits when targeting that platform. Put an idiot user in front of any operating system, though, and bad things will happen. I'm recalling a Mozilla bug report where a user clicked to pass through SSL security warnings galore for myspace, facebook, etc. and then complained to Mozilla about it instead of realizing there was a man in the middle attack.