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LarsenNET
03-23-2010, 06:35 AM
For those of you that don't see much difference between DVD's and Bluray need to see these screen shots (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1237254).

Dukefrukem
03-23-2010, 06:42 AM
who the hell thinks this?

Gorvi
03-23-2010, 06:45 AM
who the hell thinks this?
Blind people. ;)

CappinCanuck
03-23-2010, 07:41 AM
Blind people. ;)

Or with failing vision. The difference is astounding even in not so great conversions of old movies.

Siraris
03-23-2010, 07:45 AM
who the hell thinks this?

Kamalot and his wife, and a few other disingenuous people on EvilAvatar.

txshurricane
03-23-2010, 07:48 AM
Hi-def is great and all, but really...do we need to see David Caruso's pockmarks?

Drayven
03-23-2010, 07:54 AM
Not that it's really related to this exactly but one thing I've noticed since switching over to an HD cable feed, studios really need to update their green screen technology.

Khrymsyn
03-23-2010, 07:57 AM
Blu-Ray is definitely better looking than DVD.

But here's where my support of Blu-Ray falters...

If I want to watch a DVD, I've got 4 different places in my house that can handle that... Blu-Ray? 1.
If I want to buy a DVD, I can expect to pay 5-10$ (I generally shop for older releases and/or used). Blu-Ray? $10-$20

So this basically comes down to... Do I want better picture, or do I want the ability to watch anywhere in my house for cheaper?
So far, choice 2 is winning by a landslide in my house.

CappinCanuck
03-23-2010, 08:01 AM
Blu-Ray is definitely better looking than DVD.

But here's where my support of Blu-Ray falters...

If I want to watch a DVD, I've got 4 different places in my house that can handle that... Blu-Ray? 1.
If I want to buy a DVD, I can expect to pay 5-10$ (I generally shop for older releases and/or used). Blu-Ray? $10-$20

So this basically comes down to... Do I want better picture, or do I want the ability to watch anywhere in my house for cheaper?
So far, choice 2 is winning by a landslide in my house.

That's just a matter of time though isn't it? Like, if you had to replace a DVD player and could get a Bluray for 100-150, and a DVD for 50-100, which would you pick? I'm guessing Blu-ray.

I, for example, don't even have a dvd player anymore. Tossed it and everything is bluray since it plays both anyway. TBH, I haven't watched a DVD in over a year.

Dukefrukem
03-23-2010, 08:04 AM
Kamalot

Understand completely.

Gorvi
03-23-2010, 08:09 AM
Blu-Ray is definitely better looking than DVD.

But here's where my support of Blu-Ray falters...

If I want to watch a DVD, I've got 4 different places in my house that can handle that... Blu-Ray? 1.
If I want to buy a DVD, I can expect to pay 5-10$ (I generally shop for older releases and/or used). Blu-Ray? $10-$20

So this basically comes down to... Do I want better picture, or do I want the ability to watch anywhere in my house for cheaper?
So far, choice 2 is winning by a landslide in my house.
I can understand that, but I didn't spend the money on a 52" 1080p LCD to watch movies on the TVs in my other rooms, which are both 27" SDTVs.

frederec
03-23-2010, 08:09 AM
That's just a matter of time though isn't it? Like, if you had to replace a DVD player and could get a Bluray for 100-150, and a DVD for 50-100, which would you pick? I'm guessing Blu-ray.

I, for example, don't even have a dvd player anymore. Tossed it and everything is bluray since it plays both anyway. TBH, I haven't watched a DVD in over a year.

True, but some things are still taking a little too long. For instance, lately my wife has been wanting a TV for the kitchen, to have something on while cooking or doing dishes (honestly, the feeling is mutual). Because of space constraints, it would be nice to get a relatively small TV/dvd combo. But after (admittedly briefly) looking around, I haven't found any TV/blu-ray combo players. And I can't help but suspect if I were to find one, it would be fairly expensive.

LarsenNET
03-23-2010, 08:10 AM
Blu-Ray is definitely better looking than DVD.

But here's where my support of Blu-Ray falters...

If I want to watch a DVD, I've got 4 different places in my house that can handle that... Blu-Ray? 1.
If I want to buy a DVD, I can expect to pay 5-10$ (I generally shop for older releases and/or used). Blu-Ray? $10-$20

So this basically comes down to... Do I want better picture, or do I want the ability to watch anywhere in my house for cheaper?
So far, choice 2 is winning by a landslide in my house.

The problem is depending on how many you buy your building a library of on old format which are next to worthless second hand. Then down the road when Blu-ray players are dirt cheap you won't have the library to take advantage of high def. Some of the bigger releases are selling them as Blu+DVD combo's so that is a plus.

I've been trying to get rid of a bunch of DVD's but they are hard to get rid of and you get next to nothing for them so It's been slow goings upgrading my library.

LarsenNET
03-23-2010, 08:18 AM
How about for $79? (http://www.amazon.com/Sylvania-NB530SLX-Blu-ray-Player-Black/dp/B001S0I1M0/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1269353746&sr=8-4-spell)

As for as the movies go you have to watch for sales. You can get a lot on Amazon for $10-$15. Some of the Disney's are high like Toy Story is $25.

Edit: Khrymsyn, did you did you delete your post?

TheFlyingOrc
03-23-2010, 08:27 AM
For those of you that don't see much difference between DVD's and Bluray need to see these screen shots (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1237254).

...I'm sitting 12 inches away from the screen. This is in no way representative of the visual difference one gets when sitting proper viewing distances from a television.

edit: And why is the color wrong on all those DVD shots? I think the guy generating these screenshots has lousy cables.

Gorvi
03-23-2010, 08:32 AM
...I'm sitting 12 inches away from the screen. This is in no way representative of the visual difference one gets when sitting proper viewing distances from a television.

edit: And why is the color wrong on all those DVD shots? I think the guy generating these screenshots has lousy cables.
Really? Pulling back 4 feet from my monitor I can see the difference clearly.

LarsenNET
03-23-2010, 08:34 AM
edit: And why is the color wrong on all those DVD shots? I think the guy generating these screenshots has lousy cables.

The guy is really well known for comparison shots so I doubt it.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 08:39 AM
I rip my movies to my HDD, and stream them to my network. I love it.

Shjinta
03-23-2010, 08:45 AM
I don't even own a HDTV lol.. SD for me baby. I have too big of a DVD collection. I own like 3 Blurays. Also i've been lazy lately. I have a 250GB HDD on my PS3. I just rip my movies to that. Hit play let it cycle through them. Who needs HD.

I have a question though. Is it normal HD kills the FPS on games? When I play NHL 10 on my old school TV is fast, and fun. When I try it on my Dads killer HDTV, it's slow as shit. Do you really give up a fast FPS for a tiny picture upgrade?

Chris_D
03-23-2010, 08:58 AM
I've still only got a 22 inch 720p set so I'm not going to get hung up on whether it's a DVD or bluray I'm watching. Most of my media is downloaded anyway.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 09:03 AM
I don't even own a HDTV lol.. SD for me baby. I have too big of a DVD collection. I own like 3 Blurays. Also i've been lazy lately. I have a 250GB HDD on my PS3. I just rip my movies to that. Hit play let it cycle through them. Who needs HD.

I have a question though. Is it normal HD kills the FPS on games? When I play NHL 10 on my old school TV is fast, and fun. When I try it on my Dads killer HDTV, it's slow as shit. Do you really give up a fast FPS for a tiny picture upgrade?

I honestly have no clue what you're talking about. I've never, ever noticed a graphics slowdown when playing on a HDTV compared to a SDTV. If anything, everything moves and looks better.

TheFlyingOrc
03-23-2010, 09:07 AM
Really? Pulling back 4 feet from my monitor I can see the difference clearly.

1. Primarily in color, not resolution, and I have no idea why his color accuracy is so low. Perhaps he feels it is fair for the purposes of this test to use composite cables rather than component?

2. The difference would be significantly less obvious when the scene was actually moving, versus still shots.

3. After the first 30 seconds of the movie you aren't paying attention to video fidelity at all.

Remember - when you're watching a movie, you aren't looking for "Can I tell that this has a higher resolution" unless you're attempting to justify your purchase.

LarsenNET
03-23-2010, 09:13 AM
who the hell thinks this?

Apparently Flyingorc's. :p

Siraris
03-23-2010, 09:20 AM
I watch HD shows and movies on my computer monitor sometimes, sit about 3 feet from it, and can easily notice a difference. EASILY.

LongStepMantis
03-23-2010, 09:27 AM
Blu-ray is unquestionably superior...I just don't give a shit. DVD for me, thanks.
I grew up watching bad VHS bootlegs with tracking errors, static-y sound, and horrendous visual quality. DVD is as much improvement as I'm likely to need for years. To each their own, obviously.

I've said it before, but I'll buy Blu-rays when they don't make DVDs anymore, and not any sooner.

Kagger
03-23-2010, 09:28 AM
Hi-def is great and all, but really...do we need to see David Caruso's pockmarks?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/KaggeR/david_caruso_sunglasses.jpg

I'm pretty sure the image speaks for itself...

Gorvi
03-23-2010, 09:30 AM
1. Primarily in color, not resolution, and I have no idea why his color accuracy is so low. Perhaps he feels it is fair for the purposes of this test to use composite cables rather than component?
Maybe it's a difference in the source? Most of the colors look to be about the same to me, with some aspects of the background being the only real difference.
2. The difference would be significantly less obvious when the scene was actually moving, versus still shots.
That all depends, but having access to both the difference is always apparent.
3. After the first 30 seconds of the movie you aren't paying attention to video fidelity at all.

Remember - when you're watching a movie, you aren't looking for "Can I tell that this has a higher resolution" unless you're attempting to justify your purchase.
While you're not explicitly paying attention to that it's going to effect the visual quality regardless. That's like saying you won't notice the difference between stereo and surround sound unless you're trying to justify your purchase.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 09:43 AM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v471/KaggeR/david_caruso_sunglasses.jpg

I'm pretty sure the image speaks for itself...

Looks like that's a picture.....

*Glasses*

...Worth a thousand words.

YEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!!!!!!!

Kagger
03-23-2010, 09:44 AM
Blu-ray is unquestionably superior...I just don't give a shit. DVD for me, thanks.
I grew up watching bad VHS bootlegs with tracking errors, static-y sound, and horrendous visual quality. DVD is as much improvement as I'm likely to need for years. To each their own, obviously.

I've said it before, but I'll buy Blu-rays when they don't make DVDs anymore, and not any sooner.

I agree, most things don't need the Blu-Ray treatment, but then there are things like Batman Begins and the Dark Knight which stood out to me on Blu-Ray, especially the IMAX scenes in the Dark Knight. With those movies, black was truly black. Yes, the people were clearer, but the jaw dropping part was just the enhancement of the darkness. It was no longer a gray, but the absence of color.

A couple of weeks ago I rented Memento on Blu-Ray. Sure, it was very clear, but never once did I say "Dang, this looks so much better than on DVD." At least Blockbuster charges the same.

biosc1
03-23-2010, 09:45 AM
Remember - when you're watching a movie, you aren't looking for "Can I tell that this has a higher resolution" unless you're attempting to justify your purchase.

Some people are audiophiles and some people are videophiles. I look for the best image I can produce. I tweak the heck out of a new tv to make sure it is giving me the best blacks, whites, and colours.

I notice the higher resolution many times when watching a movie. There are a lot of movies where the set design adds to the movie and being able to see the set or other actors clearly in the background add depth to my movie watching experience.

My favourite example is still the Planet Earth series. Watching a flock of thousands of white birds take off and having them all in frame and distinguishable without pixels blowing up and ruining the image, it looks breathtaking.

Again, to each their own.


A couple of weeks ago I rented Memento on Blu-Ray. Sure, it was very clear, but never once did I say "Dang, this looks so much better than on DVD." At least Blockbuster charges the same.

Remember, not all Blu-Rays are the same, just like quality between DVDs vary. It really depends on the authoring quality of the disc. If they use a crappy source, you can get a clearer picture still, but you'll lose the depth.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 09:49 AM
I've got a friend who has a HUGE DVD collection. He's rebuying them all on Blu-Ray. I think he's batshit crazy, but this is the same guy who went out (when we were roommates) and spent 150 dollars on movies a day before he owed me rent, and couldn't give me his half of it that month.

I'm of the 'Buy DVD because it's cheaper for movies I don't care about the quality of, and Blu-Ray for those that really matter' I buy a lot more Blu-Ray now of course, but I generally go with that little rule. Dark Knight I -had- to have on Blue Ray. Same with most animated movies (Monsters Vs Aliens looks spectacular on Blu-Ray) but others? Maximum Overdrive is one of my fave movies ever, but I own it on DVD. No need to Hi-Def it.

LongStepMantis
03-23-2010, 09:50 AM
I agree, most things don't need the Blu-Ray treatment, but then there are things like Batman Begins and the Dark Knight which stood out to me on Blu-Ray, especially the IMAX scenes in the Dark Knight. With those movies, black was truly black. Yes, the people were clearer, but the jaw dropping part was just the enhancement of the darkness. It was no longer a gray, but the absence of color.

A couple of weeks ago I rented Memento on Blu-Ray. Sure, it was very clear, but never once did I say "Dang, this looks so much better than on DVD." At least Blockbuster charges the same.

That's the other part of the equation that keeps me at bay. Most of the movies I buy are either comedies, kung-fu flicks, or TV show collections. Many of those being older movies or shows from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. I'll buy the occasional action flick, but not so much anymore. The things I watch aren't going to benefit much from improved visuals.

If I was the kind of guy who bought every action blockbuster that comes out, then I might change my tune. Watching old episodes of Monty Python's Flying Circus from 1969...yeah, HD isn't going to fix shit. :p

Dukefrukem
03-23-2010, 09:52 AM
Apparently Flyingorc's. :p

amazing...

Inverarity
03-23-2010, 10:24 AM
If I was the kind of guy who bought every action blockbuster that comes out, then I might change my tune. Watching old episodes of Monty Python's Flying Circus from 1969...yeah, HD isn't going to fix shit. :p
Depending on the way the shows were produced, you might be surprised. The recent Blu-Ray release of the 1967-68 series The Prisoner is a startling upgrade over the DVDs. (Granted, it's considered an important series that was worthy of a careful transfer.) Old shows that were shot on video, or that used a mixture of video and film, probably aren't going to benefit much from a BD transfer. Shows that were shot completely on film can look terrific, though.

LarsenNET
03-23-2010, 10:40 AM
Depending on the way the shows were produced, you might be surprised. The recent Blu-Ray release of the 1967-68 series The Prisoner is a startling upgrade over the DVDs. (Granted, it's considered an important series that was worthy of a careful transfer.) Old shows that were shot on video, or that used a mixture of video and film, probably aren't going to benefit much from a BD transfer. Shows that were shot completely on film can look terrific, though.

Yeah, that's the way I understand it. Supposedly film has considerably higher resolution than 1080p *but* they have to make a new transfer. For example if they simply use the DVD transfer and bump up the bitrate it's not going to make a huge difference. I'm looking forward to Star Wars on Blu, Lucas is obsessed with the highest quality so it should look amazing.

I bought the Godfather trilogy on Blu and it looks really good.

Urizen
03-23-2010, 10:54 AM
I rip my movies to my HDD, and stream them to my network. I love it.

I don't use my network, but I use a WDTV Player with an external HDD attached.

My problem is I'm always running out of room. I thought 4TB would last me a while, but now I'm already feeling the squeeze, and have started to delete the stuff I thought would always be there on the HDD whenever I wanted it.

What's your system?

TheFlyingOrc
03-23-2010, 11:01 AM
Some people are audiophiles and some people are videophiles. I look for the best image I can produce. I tweak the heck out of a new tv to make sure it is giving me the best blacks, whites, and colours.

Both videophiles and audiophiles are insane. Yes, you can actually TELL the difference. However, when the movie is running, you don't really pick it up.



I notice the higher resolution many times when watching a movie. There are a lot of movies where the set design adds to the movie and being able to see the set or other actors clearly in the background add depth to my movie watching experience.

Hoo boy this comedy is funnier and this drama is more moving because the resolution is higher.


My favourite example is still the Planet Earth series. Watching a flock of thousands of white birds take off and having them all in frame and distinguishable without pixels blowing up and ruining the image, it looks breathtaking.

Again, to each their own.

Well, yeah - of course I'd recommend HD media for "pretty pictures: The show." It's just silly to act like Toy Story is going to be any better because the resolution is higher.

I have a nice TV. I don't have a BluRay player because converting my collection for a small increase in crispness of the image is silly.

DangerousDaze
03-23-2010, 11:04 AM
Betamax FTW!

Kagger
03-23-2010, 11:04 AM
That's the other part of the equation that keeps me at bay. Most of the movies I buy are either comedies, kung-fu flicks, or TV show collections. Many of those being older movies or shows from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. I'll buy the occasional action flick, but not so much anymore. The things I watch aren't going to benefit much from improved visuals.

If I was the kind of guy who bought every action blockbuster that comes out, then I might change my tune. Watching old episodes of Monty Python's Flying Circus from 1969...yeah, HD isn't going to fix shit. :p

Yeah, most DVD's I buy are TV shows. However, when I can rent on Blu-Ray I do now. I will be buying any action or animated movies on Blu-Ray from now on (espeically with Disney's DVD/Blu-Ray Combo). I have only a handful of movies I really want to replace. Saving Private Ryan, Star Wars, and Terminator 2, and the Dark Knight are really the major ones I want to replace.


I use my PS3 to upscale DVD's though. I notice on some DVD's the picture gets really fuzzy. Is that an issue wit the cable, or the encoding? It happened with the 2 disc The Departed. About 30 minutes in it stopped though.

TheFlyingOrc
03-23-2010, 11:05 AM
I use my PS3 to upscale DVD's though. I notice on some DVD's the picture gets really fuzzy. Is that an issue wit the cable, or the encoding? It happened with the 2 disc The Departed. About 30 minutes in it stopped though.

I'd say it's almost certainly software related if it cleared up just sitting there.

DangerousDaze
03-23-2010, 11:08 AM
It happened with the 2 disc The Departed. About 30 minutes in it stopped though.
When your next-door neighbour stopped drilling, perchance? ;)

Savok
03-23-2010, 11:26 AM
For those of you that don't see much difference between DVD's and Bluray need to see these screen shots (http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1237254).
That's bullshit, my DVDs look better then that.

I have a PS3 now so I can watch Blue-ray but... well fuck it, I still don't want the bloody things. It's better but not by much, I have glasses anyway and getting a brand new prescription just to count the hairs in some jackoffs nose seems completely pointless.

I mean yeah, I am an audiophile, my ears pick up things most people's ears don't but I'm not out there murdering people for listening to CDs rather then SACDs. They can't hear the difference, fuck it, CDs are simpler anyway.

roboninja
03-23-2010, 12:44 PM
That's the other part of the equation that keeps me at bay. Most of the movies I buy are either comedies, kung-fu flicks, or TV show collections. Many of those being older movies or shows from the 70s, 80s, and 90s. I'll buy the occasional action flick, but not so much anymore. The things I watch aren't going to benefit much from improved visuals.

If I was the kind of guy who bought every action blockbuster that comes out, then I might change my tune. Watching old episodes of Monty Python's Flying Circus from 1969...yeah, HD isn't going to fix shit. :p

You might be surprised. Life of Brian on Blu-ray looks absolutely stunning, almost like a new movie. As has been said, film stock has a greater resolution than 1080p. If the stock is good, and/or good restorative work is done, HD advantage can be seen.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 03:42 PM
I don't use my network, but I use a WDTV Player with an external HDD attached.

My problem is I'm always running out of room. I thought 4TB would last me a while, but now I'm already feeling the squeeze, and have started to delete the stuff I thought would always be there on the HDD whenever I wanted it.

What's your system?

Wireless until I can get something dedicated next to the TV. Thought about running a wired system, but it's not feasible right now with the way everything is. I stream using PS3 Media Server to my PS3 or 360, and if a movie is too hi-def for the stream, I throw it on a USB thumb drive and play it directly. Once I replace this computer with another, I'll more than likely turn it into a media PC.

Urizen
03-23-2010, 04:26 PM
Wireless until I can get something dedicated next to the TV. Thought about running a wired system, but it's not feasible right now with the way everything is. I stream using PS3 Media Server to my PS3 or 360, and if a movie is too hi-def for the stream, I throw it on a USB thumb drive and play it directly. Once I replace this computer with another, I'll more than likely turn it into a media PC.

OK, so it sounds like you're not that attached to your library of content for the most part. You purge data from time to time.

I'd really have to hate a movie or series to delete it.

Voodoo
03-23-2010, 04:43 PM
Aren't those Toy Story 2 BluRay screenshots from the completely re-rendered version they did specifically for BluRay? I thought that Pixar was re-rendering all their movies specifically for BluRay. Not that it makes a difference, BluRay is definitely higher resolution than DVD, just thought I'd mention that; it is great that Pixar did it and I feel other should as well when they release a BluRay.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 05:12 PM
OK, so it sounds like you're not that attached to your library of content for the most part. You purge data from time to time.

I'd really have to hate a movie or series to delete it.

Who said anything about purging? I've got 1TB of stuff so far, and it's growing more and more because I DON'T delete stuff. Maybe you misread the USB thing, but I do that to watch it...I keep the original file on the HDD.

Voodoo
03-23-2010, 05:16 PM
Who said anything about purging? I've got 1TB of stuff so far, and it's growing more and more because I DON'T delete stuff. Maybe you misread the USB thing, but I do that to watch it...I keep the original file on the HDD.
In the past, I converted a good portion of my DVD collection to 480P DivX. Now I am batching those files and converting them to 480P MP4 with lovely and fast CUDA acceleration. What is nice is I can now drag and drop movies onto my Nexus or iPhone whereas before I had to convert first then transfer. The movies play extremely well on my PS3 too.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 05:57 PM
Eh, I never take movies on the go with me unless it's on a laptop. I've tried watching stuff on an iPod screen, and I honestly don't like it all that much. I don't even like watching video on my PSP unless I'm REALLY bored and lazy and wanna watch from bed :p

I prefer to keep things in as high a quality as possible, which means 720p for DVDs and 1080p for Blu-Ray.

Chris_D
03-23-2010, 05:58 PM
I watch a lot of stuff on my iPod Touch these days. Works great and allows me to keep up with a lot of stuff I otherwise wouldn't be able to.

Voodoo
03-23-2010, 06:06 PM
I prefer to keep things in as high a quality as possible, which means 720p for DVDs and 1080p for Blu-Ray.
What is the typical file size them? Also, what bit rate do you usually use?

LarsenNET
03-23-2010, 06:38 PM
I prefer to keep things in as high a quality as possible, which means 720p for DVDs and 1080p for Blu-Ray.

DVD's are 480p. Although some TV's or players "upconvert" to the native resolution of the set it's really a play on words. You can't make more resolution from something that isn't there.

Draconis
03-23-2010, 06:43 PM
So,

Would it, be considered, ya know....a BAD thing...how many blu ray movies I have?

I think I stopped counting after 150. I need more shelves for them all.


I think what sold me on Blu Ray the most was the movie the Host. For some reason, the HD transfer on that is brilliant and crisp and clear as day. Ever since then, I was hooked.

Urizen
03-23-2010, 07:37 PM
What is the typical file size them? Also, what bit rate do you usually use?

Precisely what I was thinking. At 720p, my movies tends to be around 9GB. 1TB doesn't sound like a terribly large library, unless I'm doing something wrong.

Shjinta
03-23-2010, 08:02 PM
I honestly have no clue what you're talking about. I've never, ever noticed a graphics slowdown when playing on a HDTV compared to a SDTV. If anything, everything moves and looks better.

I must be crazy. I notice on my dads 56 720p tv that NHL 10 runs slower. Not like really insanely slow. But I notice that it runs slower. Was just curious.

Voodoo
03-23-2010, 08:44 PM
Precisely what I was thinking. At 720p, my movies tends to be around 9GB. 1TB doesn't sound like a terribly large library, unless I'm doing something wrong.
In my case, I'm using up about 430GB for 670 movies at the moment. The movies are encoded for 480P resolution playback with AAC 5.1 audio in a MP4 package.

Loki
03-23-2010, 09:18 PM
My BluRay viriginity was popped when I saw Band of Brothers. Fantastic transfer with amazing audio. Never forget.

Hawkzombie
03-23-2010, 10:32 PM
My movies turn out at 1-1.5gb each at (insert proper ratior number here, as I rip them according to their source).

Dunno what program you guys are using, but I use Handbrake (http://handbrake.fr/), and it works wonderfully. I get results like this:

http://i778.photobucket.com/albums/yy66/Hawkzombie/Stuff/DVD.png

Which for me is just fine (for DVDs at least).

You'll have to forgive me though, I automatically assumed DVDs were produced at 720p (Because that's what my PS3 upscales them to, duh) and Blu-Ray play for me at 1080p. Just blame me using the wrong gargon. I went with the width of most of them, not the height.

Urizen
03-23-2010, 10:35 PM
In my case, I'm using up about 430GB for 670 movies at the moment. The movies are encoded for 480P resolution playback with AAC 5.1 audio in a MP4 package.

Holy shit!

I need to learn how to do this. As I said earlier, I'm feeling the squeeze on 4TB of space. Do you rip the the entire disc volume (extras, multiple audio tracks, commentary) or just the movie file?

I have a little over 1TB in taking up 100 movies, and another 1.5TB taking up about 90 series of TV shows and anime. I'd much rather buy more/larger storage than re-encode everything I have, but I need to learn how to do what you're doing.

muddi900
03-24-2010, 12:49 AM
Both videophiles and audiophiles are insane. Yes, you can actually TELL the difference. However, when the movie is running, you don't really pick it up.

I am not a videophile and I can clearly see the difference.

Voodoo
03-24-2010, 11:02 AM
Holy shit!

I need to learn how to do this. As I said earlier, I'm feeling the squeeze on 4TB of space. Do you rip the the entire disc volume (extras, multiple audio tracks, commentary) or just the movie file?

I have a little over 1TB in taking up 100 movies, and another 1.5TB taking up about 90 series of TV shows and anime. I'd much rather buy more/larger storage than re-encode everything I have, but I need to learn how to do what you're doing.
Sure thing, I'll describe my process and my machine...

Machine
AMD Phenom 9550 (2.2 Ghz Quad)
8GB RAM (configured in two 64 bit channels)
XFX 8800GT 512MB

Programs Used

DVDFab - I use this program to rip the DVD to DivX (480p) format (No MP4 here because it takes far too long with no CUDA) with 5.1 sound. I only do the main movie, no subtitles and only the 5.1 track. I have the DivX encoding at 2048kbps and the audio is MP3 at 192bit with 5.1 encoding. It typically takes 30 mins to convert a DVD into DIVX format.

Mediashow Espresso - This CUDA accelerated program takes those DivX files (batched) and converts them into 1024kbps MP4 (480p) files with variable bit rate AAC 5.1 audio. It typically takes 12 minutes to convert a 2 hour movie from DivX to MP4.

Initially my movies are about 1GB each but they contain a lot of data that I don't need. Essentially, since the source was 480p I have no need for encoding the videos at 720P or 1080P. Once my process is done, the new movie file is an average of 650MB for a hour and half movie.

Example:
Angels and Demons DivX = 1.2GB
Angels and Demons MP4 = 818MB

frederec
03-24-2010, 11:06 AM
Is there a relatively easy way to rip Blu-Ray movies yet? Last I checked, there weren't many programs that supported it. I think handbrake might, but I haven't looked into it quite enough.

LarsenNET
03-24-2010, 11:15 AM
Is there a relatively easy way to rip Blu-Ray movies yet? Last I checked, there weren't many programs that supported it. I think handbrake might, but I haven't looked into it quite enough.

Yes, but it looks like way too much work. (http://gizmodo.com/5161848/how-to-rip-blu+ray-discs)

frederec
03-24-2010, 11:22 AM
Yes, but it looks like way too much work. (http://gizmodo.com/5161848/how-to-rip-blu+ray-discs)

That does look annoying, but the only thing on that list that costs money (AnyDVDHD) I already have, so that's at least something.

muddi900
03-24-2010, 11:25 AM
Sure thing, I'll describe my process and my machine...

Machine
AMD Phenom 9550 (2.2 Ghz Quad)
8GB RAM (configured in two 64 bit channels)
XFX 8800GT 512MB

Programs Used

DVDFab - I use this program to rip the DVD to DivX format (No MP4 here because it takes far too long with no CUDA) with 5.1 sound. I only do the main movie, no subtitles and only the 5.1 track. I have the DivX encoding at 2048kbps and the audio is MP3 at 192bit with 5.1 encoding. It typically takes 30 mins to convert a DVD into DIVX format.

Mediashow Espresso - This CUDA accelerated program takes those DivX files and converts the into 1024kbps MP4 files with variable bit rate AAC 5.1 audio. It typically takes 12 minutes to convert a 2 hour movie from DivX to MP4.

Initially my movies are about 1GB each but they contain a lot of data that I don't need. Essentially, since the source was 480p I have no need for encoding the videos at 720P or 1080P. Once my process is done, the new movie file is an average of 650MB for a hour and half movie.

Example:
Angels and Demons DivX = 1.2GB
Angels and Demons MP4 = 818MB

There is one problem with H264 encoding; you can do MKV or MOV and lose wide compatibility or do MP4 and lose 5.1 audio(for most devices). I've also found that increasing stages in encoding sometimes noticeably deteriorates the quality. Handbrake now does only H264, why not use that?

Dukefrukem
03-24-2010, 11:25 AM
Is there a relatively easy way to rip Blu-Ray movies yet? Last I checked, there weren't many programs that supported it. I think handbrake might, but I haven't looked into it quite enough.

There isn't even anything to take good screencaps of Blu-ray movies yet... arghhhh

Urizen
03-24-2010, 11:37 AM
I appreciate the tutorial. I know I have a couple dozen bloated ISOs that could easily be trimmed to less than 20% of their current size. I'm going give this a try.

Voodoo
03-24-2010, 11:38 AM
There is one problem with H264 encoding; you can do MKV or MOV and lose wide compatibility or do MP4 and lose 5.1 audio(for most devices). I've also found that increasing stages in encoding sometimes noticeably deteriorates the quality. Handbrake now does only H264, why not use that?
My files are stored in MP4 format and retaining 5.1 audio. On devices that don't playback the 5.1 AAC (Nexus One or iPhone) the audio to downmixed to 2.0. You'll only experience loss of quality of you go from a lower bit rate or sample rate to a higher. If you go from higher to lower, you're OK. I don't use Handbrake because I couldn't get it to do CUDA acceleration.

roboninja
03-24-2010, 12:14 PM
My BluRay viriginity was popped when I saw Band of Brothers. Fantastic transfer with amazing audio. Never forget.

Just got this delivered yesterday. Looking forward to trying another Blu-ray only feature, picture-in-picture commentary.

Urizen
03-24-2010, 12:31 PM
My files are stored in MP4 format and retaining 5.1 audio. On devices that don't playback the 5.1 AAC (Nexus One or iPhone) the audio to downmixed to 2.0. You'll only experience loss of quality of you go from a lower bit rate or sample rate to a higher. If you go from higher to lower, you're OK. I don't use Handbrake because I couldn't get it to do CUDA acceleration.

Pardon my ignorance, but do you re-encode for your Nexus One and iPhone, does the device do the downmixing?

roboninja
03-24-2010, 12:42 PM
The device is what I am reading. Voodoo said he only encodes once.

TheKeck
03-24-2010, 12:49 PM
How about for $79? (http://www.amazon.com/Sylvania-NB530SLX-Blu-ray-Player-Black/dp/B001S0I1M0/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1269353746&sr=8-4-spell)

Or, today, $59.99. ;)

Voodoo
03-24-2010, 12:59 PM
Pardon my ignorance, but do you re-encode for your Nexus One and iPhone, does the device do the downmixing?
I now use the same file via DLNA clients, my Nexus One and my iPhone. The PS3 I have plays the videos via my DLNA server. The Nexus One uses Act1 Video Player and the iPhone uses the built in player.

Wilkz07
03-24-2010, 01:03 PM
I'll buy a bluray over a dvd any day provided there is some good extra features and its a newer movie to warrant spending over $25. I paid 9.99 for Near Dark on bluray and thats about as high as i'll go for pre-bluray introduction titles.

a movie like Swingers which doesn't serve any purpose to update to bluray I was happy to pick it up for 6.99 new.

Scull
03-24-2010, 01:12 PM
By the way, ripping a Blu-Ray is very, very easy. Read this: http://lifehacker.com/5498519/makemkv-rips-dvds-and-blu+rays-with-just-two-clicks

Tried it out last night and it worked fine. Huge file size on The Dark Knight (12GB), but it was simple as simple can be.

Hawkzombie
03-24-2010, 01:29 PM
I don't even know what CUDA Acceleration is, personally :p

I guess I'm not an audiophile lol...but Handbrake is what I use for everything.

Voodoo
03-24-2010, 01:31 PM
I don't even know what CUDA Acceleration is, personally :p

I guess I'm not an audiophile lol...but Handbrake is what I use for everything.
CUDA is an nVidia programming toolset that can be used to accelerate a great many things. There are media transcoding programs that make use of CUDA to accelerate the transcoding process via offloading processing to your GPU. For example, normally without CUDA my transcodes would take 30 to 40 mins. With CUDA they take 10 to 13 minutes.

It is being slowly replaced by open standard pretty soon though... OpenCL. Microsoft has a version too called DirectCompute, which is uses to limited abilities through the built in Win7 DVD creator.

Hawkzombie
03-24-2010, 01:55 PM
Oh, interesting. Good thing I never really made use of it, as I swapped out my POS nVidia (dying fan) with a new ATI lol...But the concept has me intrigued. But I usually Queue up stuff for conversions over night and just rip as I'm sitting at the computer.

One thing I hate about Handbrake is it changed recently to ONLY output to MP4 and MKV. I guess it's to better rip to portable devices and formats 360 and PS3 will read, but I liked having choice (....even though all I ever ripped to was MKV or MP4. I'm weird, I know :p)

muddi900
03-25-2010, 01:37 PM
My files are stored in MP4 format and retaining 5.1 audio. On devices that don't playback the 5.1 AAC (Nexus One or iPhone) the audio to downmixed to 2.0. You'll only experience loss of quality of you go from a lower bit rate or sample rate to a higher. If you go from higher to lower, you're OK. I don't use Handbrake because I couldn't get it to do CUDA acceleration.

5.1 AAC? don't you mean AC3? Official MP4 spec only supports 2 channels and I never was able to play MP4 with 5.1 AC3 in WMP12, Xbox 360 and The PS3. Are you using a transcoding DLNA server? Like the PS3 media server or Tversity?